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Important Bird Areas Map

A map of Oregon's Important Bird Areas

Red Marker Alsea Bay
The Alsea Bay IBA includes all tidelands, submerged lands and some adjacent uplands in Alsea Bay, including the Bayview Oxbow, Eckman Lake, Lint Slough, the last mile of Starr Creek, and approximately the last 2 miles of Drift Creek before its convergence with the Alsea River, and downstream to the river mouth.

Location: Alsea Bay IBA is on the central Oregon coast where the Alsea River meets the Pacific Ocean, adjacent to the city of Waldport in southern Lincoln County.

Description: Alsea Bay is one of the most pristine estuaries on the Oregon Coast and is home to healthy fall Chinook salmon, elk and river otter. The bay offers amazing recreational opportunities such as birding, wildlife watching, camping, fishing and boating.

Ornithological Highlights: IBA species threshold triggers include Caspian Tern, Brown Pelican, high concentrations of shorebirds and waterfowl. Other species of interest include: Belted Kingfisher, American Coot, Great Egret, Great Blue Heron, Bald Eagle, Surf Scoter, Northern Pintail, Canvasback, Bufflehead, Common Goldeneye, Hooded Merganser, Common Loon, American Wigeon, Pied-billed Grebe, Western Grebe, Horned Grebe, Least Sandpiper, Greater Yellowlegs, Black Turnstone, and Dunlin.

Pelicans and Heerman's Gull Alsea Bay - Roy Lowe

Alsea Bay: For more information on Alsea Bay IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:
Klamath Bird Observatory Important Aquatic Bird Site Description
IBA of the Month: Alsea Bay

For more information on Alsea Bay contact:
Paul Engelmeyer, Coastal IBA Coordinator at 541-547-4097

44.435505 -124.057291
Red Marker Alvord Lake and Basin
Alvord Lake and Basin is a seasonal, alkali lake in eastern Harney County at the eastern foot of Steens Mountain.

Location: Alvord Lake is a seasonal, alkali lake in eastern Harney County about 8 miles north of Fields, Oregon. 

Description: Alvord Lake is a seasonal, alkali lake in eastern Harney County administered by The Bureau of Land Management.  The Alvord Desert playa is one of the largest playas in Oregon at 6 miles wide and 11 miles long, and is bounded by Steens Mountains to the west.  The lakebed is approximately 4 miles long and 1.75 miles wide. Margins are defined by wet meadow, dunes, and salt desert vegetation.  The lake is fed by Wildhorse Creek, Trout Creek and Borax Lake.  Private lands and BLM surround the lake.

Ornithological Highlights: Supports small numbers of nesting Snowy Plovers, >100 shorebirds in migration, >2000 waterfowl in migration. Also, whether in this IBA or the Steens Mountain IBA, Black-throated Sparrows are consistent along the east flank of the Steens here.  Sandhill Cranes nest in wet meadows and wetlands around Alvord Lake, mostly on the north end (7 pairs in 1999/2000 per Gary Ivey).  Other species documented by BLM in recent years include: Eared, Clark's and Western Grebe, Great Egret, mallard, Gadwall, American Wigeon, Northern Pintail, Cinnamon Teal, Canvasback, Redhead, Lesser Scaup, White-faced Ibis, Northern Harrier, Prairie Falcon, Semipalmated Plover, Killdeer, American Avocet, Black-necked Stilt, Willet, Spotted Sandpiper, Long-billed Curlew, Western Sandpiper, Baird's Sandpiper, Wilson's Phalarope, Franklin's Gull, Ring-billed Gull, California Gull, Black Tern, Common Nighthawk, Loggerhead Shrike, Common Raven, Horned Lark, Sage Thrasher, Sage Sparrow, Western Meadowlark.

For more information on Alvord Lake and Basin IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

Alvord Desert from East Steens Road, photo courtesy of BLM.
Alvord Desert from East Steens Road, photo courtesy of BLM.
42.3988686273 -118.603076935
Red Marker Anderson Butte - Sterling Ditch
Shrubland and forest land managed by the Ashland Resource Area, Medford District of the BLM in south-central Jackson County which includes ceanothus-manzanita brushfields and scrub oak habitat.

Location:  Near the city of Jacksonville in south central Jackson County, on BLM lands up Little Applegate Road (lands north of Little Applegate River) past the junction with Sterling Creek Road.  Takes in Wolf Gap, Tunnel Ridge, and Goat Cabin Ridge. 

Description: Anderson Butte/Sterling Ditch IBA falls entirely within the ODFW Anderson Butte Conservation Opportunity Area, and contains the BLM Sterling Mine Ditch Area of Critical Environmental Concern, which was designated for both cultural and botanical resources.  Anderson Butte is an east-west trending ridge north of the Little Applegate River containing Northern Spotted Owl core areas, the north slopes of which are forested and heavily-roaded for timber harvest activity.  The south slopes are a mosaic of habitat with high biodoversity of plants supporting unique guild of species.

Anderson SterlingOrnithological Highlights:  This habitat is highly important to a very specific bird community that includes Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Wrentit, Oak Titmouse, and California Towhee. All but the Wrentit are near the northern extent of their range in this IBA, and all but the gnatcatcher are year-round residents in this habitat. In addition, the manzanita in these shrublands provides resources to a diversity of birds year-round. During winter, manzanita provides a berry food source for several species, particularly Hermit Thrushes. In early spring, manzanita flowers provide a nectar heavily used by arriving Rufous Hummingbirds. The flowers are also eaten by songbirds such as Purple Finches and Golden-crowned Sparrows before and during spring migration. Photo by Dennis Vroman

For more information on Anderson Butte/Sterling Ditch IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the national IBA database.

Links: Medford District Bureau of Land Management

42.253934263 -122.965507507
Red Marker Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge
One of three large National Wildlife Refuges in the Willamette Valley, Ankeny NWR consists of flat to gently rolling land near the confluence of the Willamette and Santiam rivers.
Ankeny NWR

Location:  In the central Willamette Valley, southwest Marion County, about 10 miles south of Salem.  Ankeny NWR is just west of I-5 at exit 243.

Description:  One of three large National Wildlife Refuges in the Willamette Valley, Ankeny consists of flat to gently rolling land near the confluence of the Willamette and Santiam rivers. It was established in 1965 to provide winter habitat for Dusky Canada Geese, a subspecies that winters primarily in the Willamette Valley. Four other subspecies also regularly winter here. Riparian cottonwood and ash forests, oak woodland, wet prairie, and hedgerows provide habitat for other wildlife and native plants. (Contributed by Karen Viste-Sparkman)

Ornithological Highlights: Riparian habitat on the refuge support Yellow Warblers and Willow Flycatchers, both species that have been identified as focal species by Partners in Flight. No formal surveys have been done to estimate populations, but the Yellow Warbler population is estimated to be around 25 pairs during the breeding season. Ankeny supports large concentrations of geese and ducks during the winter. The 2000 mid-winter waterfowl count total was 38,435 ducks and geese. Peak numbers probably exceed this total, since over 32,000 geese alone have been counted roosting on the refuge. The refuge has also supported large flocks of Dunlin, with estimates peaking at 20,000 birds. Concentrations of other shorebirds can frequently be found on the refuge during migration. (Contributed by Karen Viste-Sparkman)

For more information on Ankeny NWR IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

44.77405 -123.073631
Red Marker Bandon Marsh NWR
This IBA consists of the Bandon Marsh Unit and the newly restored Ni-les'tun Unit of the Bandon Marsh NWR on the south-central Oregon coast.

Bandon Marsh

Location: Located near the mouth of the Coquille River along the South-central Oregon Coast near Bandon in Coos County.

Site Description: The nearly 900-acre Bandon Marsh NWR IBA is composed of two units: the Bandon Marsh Unit as well as the newly restored Ni-les'tun Unit east of I-101. This site contains the largest remaining tract of salt marsh in the Coquille River Estuary. Other habitats present include mudflats, sloughs, and riparian Alder forest.

Ornithological Highlights: This marsh is considered an important migratory shorebird stopover site on the Pacific Coast, with numbers peaking in spring (late April-early May) and fall (August-October). Thousands of shorebirds of numerous species are routinely found here, and peak counts include concentrations of up to 75,000 Western Sandpiper, 6,000 Dunlin, 2,500 Least Sandpiper, and 2,000 Short-billed Dowitcher.  Additional shorebird sightings include Semipalmated Plover, Black-bellied Plover, Pacific Golden Plover, Red Phalarope, and Whimbrel.  The newly restored Ni-les'tun Unit contains intertidal marsh, freshwater marsh, mudflats and riparian areas.

For more information on Bandon Marsh NWR, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

43.1363181726 -124.403343201
Red Marker Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge + Livermore Road
Baskett Slough NWR is one of three large Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuges and sits in the west-central Willamette Valley, about 10 miles west of Salem, in Northwestern Polk County. Adjacent land along Livermore Road is also included in this IBA.

Basket Slough NWR

Location: West-central Willamette Valley, about 10 miles west of Salem, in Northwestern Polk County.

Description: This national wildlife refuge was established in 1965 to provide winter habitat for Dusky Canada Geese, a subspecies that winters primarily in the Willamette Valley. Four other subspecies also regularly winter here. Oregon white oak woodland, oak savanna, and upland prairie provide habitat for other wildlife and rare native plants. (Contributed by Karen Viste-Sparkman).

Ornithological Highlights: Baskett Slough and nearby private lands provide habitat for one of the largest concentrations of the Streaked Horned Lark (Eremophila alpestris strigata), which is currently a candidate for listing under the Endangered Species Act, and is listed as critical on the Oregon sensitive species list. No formal surveys have been done on the refuge alone, but anecdotal information estimates a population of at least 10 breeding pairs. Together with adjacent private lands the breeding population easily exceeds 25 pairs. The entire population in the Willamette Valley is estimated to be less than 200 pairs. The refuge also supports a rare community of upland prairie and Oregon white oak woodland/oak savanna. Restored wetlands support concentrations of wintering waterfowl, and the mid-winter waterfowl survey detected 35,988 ducks, geese, and swans in 2001. The refuge regularly supports more than 100 shorebirds during spring and fall migrations. (Contributed by Karen Viste-Sparkman).

For more information on Baskett Slough NWR and Livermore Road IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links

44.9259183713 -123.322906494
Red Marker Beta Drive Dunlin Roost
Privately-owned mitigation pond in Linn County which hosts a significant wintering population of Dunlin.

Location: South of Albany, just off the east end of Beta Drive, north of Hwy 34 at the Tangent exit.

Description: Privately-owned mitigation pond (for a frozen food company) hosting a significant wintering population of Dunlin, which are known to roost here and forage in adjacent fields.

Ornithological Highlights: Updated data needs to be acquired from researchers in the area. Upwards of 10-15,000 Dunlin have been reported at this site. Greater White-fronted Geese, Long Billed Dowitcher, and Black-bellied Plover have also been reported here.

For more information on Beta Drive Dunlin Roost IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

 

44.5775706 -123.1032969
Red Marker Bird Rocks
Bird Rocks is a seabird colony rock off the coast of Chapman Point (north of Cannon Beach), which is included within the Oregon Islands NWR. The Bird Rocks Colony includes four large rocks including seabird colony #'s: 219-017, -018, -019 and -020.
Bird Rocks

Location:  On the northern Oregon coast, just north of Cannon Beach, near Ecola State Park in southwest Clatsop County.

Description:  This site is a small portion of the Oregon Islands NWR. It is comprised of four large rocks, one of which contains low vegetation, the rest of which are largely devoid of both vegetation and soil.

Ornithological Highlights:  Over 200 Brown Pelicans have been observed at this site. These rocks support more than 6% of Oregon's breeding population of Common Murres and 27% of the state's breeding Brandt's Cormorant population. A total of 49,542 seabirds have nested here, comprised of six species. Bald Eagles routinely forage on seabirds at this colony, and significant increase in bald eagle predation has been causing widespread nesting failure at these colonies since 1994. Some abandonment of this site is occurring.  Low flying aircraft, close approach of boats, and humans on the adjacent mainland can cause colony disturbance. Educational efforts are underway to alleviate these problems.

For more information on Bird Rocks NWR, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links: 

Oregon Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex

45.9084651906 -123.973546028
Red Marker Blanco Reef
Blanco Reef NWR is one of many seabird colony rocks included in the Oregon Islands NWR. This assemblage sits off the coast of Cape Blanco State Park on the southern Oregon Coast, Curry County. Blanco Reef includes Blacklock Point Rocks, Tower Rock, Castle Rock, Gull Rock, Needle Rock, and several unnamed rocks.

Blanco Reef

Location: On the southern Oregon coast, a series of rocks surrounding Cape Blanco and extending north to Blacklock Point, Curry County.

Description: This site is a small portion of the Oregon Islands NWR. The habitat varies from low elevation rocks to Castle Rock, which is over 150 feet high. Most rocks are devoid of vegetation. This site includes Blacklock Point Rocks (270-022), Unnamed Rock (270-022.1), Tower Rock (270-023), Castle Rock (270-024), Unnamed Rock (270-025), Unnamed Rock (270-026), Gull Rock (270-027), Unnamed Rock (270-027.1), Unnamed Rock (270-027.2), Unnamed Rock (270-027.3), Unnamed Rock (270-027.5), and Needle Rock (270-028).  Photo Roy W. Lowe, USFWS.

Ornithological Highlights: This site provides habitat for more than 45,494 nesting seabirds comprised of eight species. This site also supports 6% of Oregon's Common Murre breeding population (USFWS census data).  Low flying aircraft, close approaching boats and trespass on rocks can all cause disturbance to nesting seabirds. Educational efforts are underway to prevent such conflicts.

For more information on Blanco Reef, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links: 

42.8336813873 -124.585647583
Red Marker Boardman Grasslands
The 69,000-acre Boardman Grasslands IBA is the largest remaining single block of predominantly native shrub steppe and grassland habitats in the Columbia Basin. This IBA is in Northern Morrow County in NE Oregon.

Location: Boardman Grasslands IBA sits just south of the city of Boardman in Morrow County.  The site contains a Naval Training Facility and there is no public access permitted.

Description: The Boardman Grasslands IBA consists of two adjacent parcels totaling approximately 69,000 acres: the Boardman Conservation Area and the Boardman Bombing Range (Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility Boardman). High-quality occurrences of bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) shrub steppe, Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) steppe, basin big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. tridentata) steppe, bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoregneria spicata) grasslands and needle-and-thread (Heterostipa comata) grasslands occur here. This basin has been laregly converted to dryland and irrigated agriculture, making this IBA critical habitat for a number of native wildlife species, including ten state and/or federally-listed threatened, endangered, or sensitive wildlife species.

Ornithological Highlights: This site supports what are suspected to be the largest nesting populations in Oregon for Grasshopper Sparrow, Long-billed Curlew, and Burrowing Owl. Significant regional nesting populations of Swainson's Hawk and Ferruginous Hawk use the Juniper Canyon area of the bombing range. Other Partners in Flight focal species for conservation that occur in shrub-steppe habitats in the IBA include: Loggerhead Shrike, Sage Sparrow, Sage Thrasher, and Lark Sparrow. This range contains areas of ungrazed native bunchgrass and big sagebrush habitat. Nearly all of the area has current or planned wind power projects.

For more information on Boardman Grasslands IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

45.6893938909 -119.69707489
Red Marker Bonney Butte
Bonney Butte IBA is at the southern terminus of Surveyor’s Ridge on the southeast slope of Mt. Hood within the Mt. Hood National Forest. HawkWatch International runs a migratory raptor observation site on a mostly bald knoll along the ridge at elevation 1,754 m.

Location:  In the northern Oregon Cascades, approximately 6 miles east-southeast of Government Camp (as the crow flies), on the east side of the White River drainage within the Mount Hood National Forest, Hood River County.

Description:  The Bonney Butte IBA is at the southern terminus of Surveyor’s Ridge, which originates near Hood River, Oregon, and extends southward for approximately 50 km to the southeast flank of Mt. Hood. Bonney Butte is a mostly bald knoll with a summit elevation of 1,754 m. The south and west slopes are steep, dropping approximately 725 m to the White River on the west and 65 m to Bonney Meadows on the east. The area within a 5-km radius of Bonney Butte is forested, except for Bonney Meadows and several clearcut tracts. Hemlock, true firs, and pines are common in the surrounding forests. Several huckleberry species also commonly occur in the area. The observation site is located on the highest point of the butte.

Ornithological Highlights:  Bonney Butte has been a HawkWatch International monitoring location since 1994. Raptors are critical biological indicators of ecosystem health, and migration counts provide efficient, effective ways to collect valuable information and to provide for public learning opportunities.  The season average for total raptors (1994-2001) is 2817 birds, though numbers range from 2,500 to 4,000 annually.  The most numerous species observed are the Sharp-shinned Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, Cooper's Hawk, Turkey Vulture, and Golden Eagle, with relatively high numbers of Merlins observed here.  Up to 18 species of raptors have been documented in a single season.  In 2010, observers counted 3390 birds across 52 observation days: 588 Red-tailed Hawk, 1,438 Sharp-shinned Hawk, 420 Cooper's Hawk, 446 Turkey Vulture, 47 Northern Goshawk, 80 Golden Eagle, 68 Bald Eagle, and 108 Merlin.

For more information on Bonney Butte IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:
Bonney Butte Raptor Migration Project (HawkWatch International)

IBA of the Month: Bonney Butte

45.262896 -121.593129
Red Marker Cape Blanco Nearshore Ocean
Off the coast of Cape Blanco, an area of nutrient-rich upwellings that supports a diverse community of marine life.

Location: Off the southern Oregon coast. This area changes in size and location due to seasonal and annual changes in wind and current patterns, but is generally located within 25 miles west of Cape Blanco and south up to 50 miles.

Description: This area has relatively consistent winds and a physical obstruction to ocean currents (Cape Blanco) that combine to create the most dependable and nutrient-rich upwellings away from the immediate coastline on the Oregon coast.

Ornithological Highlights: This area has some of the highest concentrations of seabirds in the California Current System (CCS). Because of the consistency of the upwelling at this site, the area may be particularly important during segments of climatic cycles when marine food resources are relatively scarce along the West Coast. Species found to rely on upwellings associated with the upper continental slope on this site include albatross and Sooty Shearwater.

For more information on Cape Blanco Nearshore Ocean, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA Database.

42.8359472667 -124.608306885
Red Marker Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument
CSNM IBA is a 53,000-acre BLM property in southwest Oregon (Jackson County) at the junction of the Cascade, Klamath and Siskiyou mountain ranges.

Location: In southwest Oregon at the junction of the southern Oregon Cascades and Siskiyou Mountains, southeast of the city of Ashland in southeast Jackson County.

Description: The Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument was established by Bill Clinton in June 2000 under the Antiquities Act. It was singled out as an "ecological wonder with spectacular biological diversity" in recognition of its role as a biological crossroads between the Cascade, Klamath/Siskiyou, and Great Basin ecoregions. It is the nation's first National Monument established specifically to protect biodiversity. The Monument is managed by the Medford District of the Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. The BLM is currently developing its management plan for the Monument.

Outstanding Features:  Two hundred and two bird species have been reported from the Monument. In addition to its importance to particular species of concern, including Northern Spotted Owl, Great Gray Owl, Peregrine Falcon, and Willow Flycatcher, the Monument is remarkable for the array of birds that are near their range limit in the area. This list includes northern limits of Blue-gray Gnatcatcher and California Towhee, western limits of Canyon Wren and Black-billed Magpie, eastern limits of Hermit Warbler and Band-tailed Pigeon, and southern limits of Ruffed Grouse and Rufous Hummingbird. The tremendous array of habitats in the Monument provide for great diversity in vertebrate fauna (Pepper Trail, Birds of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument).

For more information, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links

Soda Mountain, John Craig, BLM
CSNM, wickimedia
42.09635 -122.51124
Red Marker China Gulch
This valley in west-central Jackson County, Oregon is roughly 6,600 acres of chaparral with scattered small forest patches in generally south-facing drainages.

Location: Southwest Oregon, west-central Jackson County, just east of the town of Applegate and north of the Applegate River.

Description: Roughly 6,600 acres of chaparral, a high priority habitat in western Oregon lowlands and valleys where chaparral has been reduced for farming and grazing.

Ornithological Highlights: This IBA contains one of the largest remaining patches of chaparral in southwest Oregon, and hosts three bird species unique to this habitat: Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Oak Titmouse, and California Towhee. Titmouse and Towhee are year-round residents here and the Gnatcatcher migrates from points south to breed here in the summer. The area also provides excellent winter cover and food resources for a diversity of birds year-round. During winter, manzanita provides a berry food source for several species, particularly Hermit Thrush. In early spring, manzanita flowers provide a nectar heavily used by arriving Rufous Hummingbird. The flowers are also eaten by Purple Finch and Golden-crowned Sparrow before and during spring migration.
Chaparral is a priority habitat in western Oregon lowlands & valleys, and has been reduced in extent in southwest Oregon through clearing for farming or grazing, overgrowth by trees due to fire suppression, clearing for development, and clearing to reduce fire hazard near developed areas.

For more information, please see the Technical Report in the National IBA database.

42.25777 -123.06788
Red Marker Clatsop Beaches
On the northern Oregon coast in Clatsop County, from the south jetty of the Columbia River to the north spit of the Necanicum River.

Location: The northern Oregon coast, from the south jetty of the Columbia River to the north spit of the Necanicum River. Includes the ocean side of Clatsop Spit, Columbia Beach, and Sunset Beach in Clatsop County, Oregon.

Description: Roughly 15 miles of wet and/or dry sand beach.

Ornithological Highlights: This stretch of beach has consistently (in season) hosted huge congregations of shorebirds (primarily Sanderlings) and sometimes large flocks of gulls. The following bird records are from Marshall et al. (2003): A flock of 80,000 Sanderlings on Clatsop Beach 23 Jul to 6 Aug 1983 is the largest single assemblage reported in Oregon. Three other peak counts include: 20,000 Sanderlings on 21 May 1977 on Sunset Beach, 1,200 Sanderlings per mile near the south jetty of the Columbia River on 15 May 1978, and an estimated 30,000 Sanderlings in 3 mi of beach near the south jetty of the Columbia River on 25 May 1978.  An estimated 1,200 Heermann's Gulls were observed on Sunset Beach, Clatsop Co., in Oct 1980. On 28 Oct 1980, 1,500 Herring Gulls and 800 Thayer's gulls were among a migrant gull concentration on Clatsop Beach.

For more information on Clatsop Beach IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database

Links: 


46.13212 -123.95989
Red Marker Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuge
Cold Springs NWR IBA is a 3,117-acre refuge east of Hermiston, Oregon, approximately 5 miles south of the Columbia River. The refuge includes a 1500-acre reservoir and surrounding marsh, diverse wetland habitats, cottonwood/willow riparian area, upland big sagebrush and native steppe grasses.

Location: Five miles south of the Columbia River and east of Hermiston, Umatilla County, Oregon.

Description: Cold springs NWR was established in 1909 as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds. The 3,117 acres of this refuge include and surround the 1,517-acre Cold Springs Reservoir. The remainder of the refuge consists of marsh, riparian, grassland, and sagebrush ecosystems.This is an overlay refuge: the Bureau of Reclamation manages the water in Cold Springs Reservoir for irrigation purposes and USFWS manages the surrounding habitat for migratory birds.

Ornithological Highlights: The refuge hosts thousands of wintering waterfowl: Mallard and Canada Geese are the dominant species, but good numbers of American Wigeon and Northern Pintail can often be found. A USFWS aerial survey in December 2002 yielded 10,740 Mallards, 3,010 Canada Geese, and 2,000 Northern Pintails. Green-winged Teal, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler, Redhead, Canvasback, Lesser Scaup, Common Merganser, Common Goldeneye, and Ring-necked Ducks are also common, though in smaller numbers. Small flocks of White-fronted Geese stop at Cold Springs during fall and spring migration. Tundra Swans can also been seen at Cold Springs. Hundreds of shorebirds can be seen during the fall migration when the upper reservoir is exposed. Counts have recorded up to 500 Western Sandpiper in August 2003 and 900 Killdeer in September 2003. Smaller numbers of shorebirds frequent Memorial Marsh during the spring migration.

Abundant wintering or migrant species include Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hermit Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Oregon Junco, and White-crowned Sparrow.

For more information on Cold Springs NWR IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

The Cold Springs NWR is a preserve for native and migratory birds. Credit: USFWS
45.8563037762 -119.158401489
Red Marker Columbia River Estuary
The Columbia River Estuary IBA runs from the Columbia River Plume in the Pacific Ocean to approximately river mile 60 at Crims Island (near Mayger, Oregon, and across from Stella, Washington).

Location: The Columbia River Estuary IBA runs from the Columbia River Plume to approximately river mile 60 at Crims Island (near Mayger, Oregon).

Description: The Columbia River Plume is a highly dynamic transition zone where freshwater from the Columbia River mixes with saltwater from the ocean. The summer plume generally pushes southward and occurs regularly offshore between Cape Meares, Oregon and Grays Harbor, Washington, while in winter it is regularly found northward and inshore (Guy, Zamon and Hunter, Jan 2008).

Ornithological Highlights: Annual seabird and marine mammal strip-transect counts have been conducted by NOAA Fisheries and OSU, and consistently record high numbers of seabirds using the area occupied by the Columbia River Plume.  Strong salinity gradients are most often encountered at Willapa Bay, Columbia River, and Cape Meares. Sooty Shearwaters and Common Murres are the numerically dominant seabird species. California Gulls, Brown Pelicans, Caspian Terns, Heerman's Gulls, DC Cormorants, Pelagic Cormorants, and Brandt's Cormorants also use the areas in spring, summer and fall. Marbled Murrelet and Rhinoceros Auklet are occasionally observed in the plume.  It is not uncommon to observe 1,000s to 10,000s of Sooty Shearwaters between April and September in the vicinity of the river mouth and plume. Common Murres, Double-crested Cormorants, Pacific Loons, Red-throated Loons, and Western Grebes also use the area and up to 1,000s.  Other species documented in the estuary include: Bufflehead, Caspian Tern, Great Blue Heron, Long-billed Curlew, Pied-billed Grebe, Red-necked Grebe, Western Snowy Plover, and Virginia Rail. The western extent of the Columbia River Estuary IBA is a designated Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network site.

For more information on the Columbia River Estuary IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links: 

46.2110275 -123.763482
Red Marker Coos River Estuary
The Coos River Estuary IBA encompasses the tidally influenced extent of the Coos River adjacent to Coos Bay, Charleston, and North Bend in west-central Coos County.

Location: South-central Oregon coast in Coos County, encompassing the tidally-influenced extent of the Coos River adjacent to Coos Bay, Charleston, and North Bend in west-central Coos County.

Description: The Coos River estuary covers 54 square miles of open channels and tidal flats around the towns of Coos Bay, North Bend, and Charleston on the southern Oregon Coast. The Coos River Estuary IBA includes the tidally-influenced extent of the Coos River, adjacent marshes, mudflats, dry sand beach, lowland roosting and feeding sites, areas along the South Slough, Millicoma Marsh, and the North Spit, including the Snowy Plover Critical Habitat Area.

Ornithological Highlights: Coos Estuary hosts hundreds of thousands of waterfowl during winter and migration periods, and tens of thousands of shorebirds of many species during spring and fall migration. Species of interest include Brown Pelican, Buff-breasted Sandpiper, Dunlin, Great Egret, Snowy Plover, and Western Sandpiper, Clark's Grebe, Common Loon, Long-billed Curlew, Pied-billed Grebe, Red-necked Grebe and Western Grebe. This IBA also includes the North Spit Snowy Plover Critical Habitat area.

For more information on the Coos River Estuary IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

South Slough NERR
South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve
43.3696182391 -124.309616089
Red Marker Coquille Point Rocks
This site includes all rocks and islands from the south jetty of the Coquille River, south to Crooked Creek.

Coquille Point - Roy W. Lowe, USFWS
Coquille Point - Roy W. Lowe, USFWS

Location: On the southern Oregon coast, just southwest of Bandon, Coos County.

Description: This site includes all rocks and islands from the south jetty of the Coquille River, south to Crooked Creek. The following seabird colonies are included in the site: Table Rock, North Coquille Point Rock, Middle Coquille Point Rock, Elephant Rock, Cat and Kittens Rock, Face Rock, Grave Point Rock, Haystack Rock, Monkey Rock, and several unnamed rocks. Habitat varies from barren rocks to rocks with deep soils and vegetation.

Ornithological Highlights: This site support 60,153 breeding seabirds comprised of 10 species. The 56,745 Common Murres found here constitute 8% of the murres breeding in Oregon and a greater number than breed in all of Washington and British Columbia combined.

For more information on Coquille Point Rocks, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

43.11455 -124.43651
Red Marker Coquille Valley
East of the city of Bandon in Coos County, roughly between the towns of Riverton and Myrtle Point, the lowland valley of the Coquille River.

Location: In Coos County, roughly between Riverton and Myrtle Point (east of Bandon), the lowland valley of the Coquille River hosts the largest coastal dabbling duck winter location on the US West Coast north of San Francisco Bay.

Description: The Coquille Valley IBA falls within an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation Strategy-identified Conservation Opportunity Area, and there is tremendous potential for restoration in the area.  A $2 million ODFW multi-phased acquisition and restoration project is underway to conserve 3,000 acres in the Coquille River lowlands, a project which will complement downstream restoration efforts at Bandon Marsh NWR.  Financial and technical support are provided by the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board and The Nature Conservancy.  The project will benefit multiple Oregon Conservation Strategy species, including Willow Flycatcher, Purple Martin, and Western Meadowlark, among others.

Ornithological Highlights: Approximately 50% of the Oregon Coast's wintering waterfowl overwinter in the Coquille River valley. American Wigeon, Lesser Scaup, Mallard, Northern Pintail, Northern Shoveler, Ring-necked Duck, Ruddy Duck, Wood Duck, Hooded Merganser, Tundra Swan, Green-winged Teal, and Osprey migrate through and/or overwinter here. Wetland restoration funded by OWEB will help to create more nesting habitat here and improve wintering habitat. Other target species include Green heron, Snowy Egret, Great Egret, American Bittern, Black-crowned Night Heron, Sora, Virginia Rail, Pied-billed Grebe, Willet, Long-billed Curlew. Raptors include White-tailed Kite, American Kestrel, Merlin, Peregrine Falcon, and Red-shouldered Hawk.

For more information on the Coquille Valley IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.1750261 -124.2330894
Red Marker Cow and Batch Lakes
Cow and Batch Lakes in eastern Oregon are flat, playa lakes about 15 miles west-northwest of Jordan Valley in eastern Malheur County.

Location: Approximately 15 miles west-northwest of Jordon Valley, east-central Malheur County.

Description: These flat, playa lakes were formed when the Jordon Crater lava flow blocked stream flows. The area contains large areas of open water and emergent vegetation. Exposed mudflats are present in late summer. Large numbers of moist soil-dependent plants are present.  Batch Lake is a deep, spring fed lake with a lava shore.  Upper and Lower Cow lakes are creek-fed and fluctuate seasonally, with minimal riparian vegetation. 

Ornithological Highlights: This cluster of lakes and marshes regularly has several thousand waterfowl and over 100 shorebirds in season (Marty St. Louis pers. comm.). In addition, several dozen pairs of Black-crowned Night-Herons breed in dense marshes in the Batch Lake complex near Cow Lakes (Contreras and Kindschy 1996). The Cow Lakes area is also considered an important Shrub-Steppe Bird Conservation Area (Altman and Holmes 2000). No known formal surveys have been conducted here. Species observed here include American White Pelican, Barrow's Goldeneye, Bufflehead, Snowy Egret, Virginia Rail, Clapper Rail, Flammulated Owl, Golden and Bald Eagle, Peregrine Falcon, Ring-necked Duck, Greater Sage Grouse, and Western Bluebird.

For more information on Cow and Batch Lakes IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.0312549287 -117.10395813
Red Marker Davis Lake
This lake is unique in the Cascades in being relatively large and shallow, having gentle slope of shore and great fluxuation in water levels providing extensive meadows, cattail marsh, and islands of bullrush.

Location: Located about 8 miles east of Willamette Pass in the south-central Oregon Cascades, straddling the Deschutes and Klamath County lines.

Description: This lake is unique in the Cascades in being relatively large and shallow, having gentle slope of shore and great fluxuation in water levels providing extensive meadows, cattail marsh, and islands of bullrush.

Ornithological Highlights: Davis Lake is an important Cascades breeding site for hundreds of Western and Eared Grebes. Other breeding birds taking advantage of the lake, marshes, and adjacent forests of Davis Lake include Bald Eagle, Sandhill Crane, Wilson's Phalarope, Barrow's Goldeneye, and a variety of other duck species. Davis Lake also hosts thousands of coots, ducks, and other waterfowl in migratory and winter seasons when the lake is not frozen.

For more information on Davis Lake, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.614318 -121.847396
Red Marker Denman Wildlife Area
The Kenneth Denman Wildlife Area, managed by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, consists of both native and cultivated grasslands, woodlands, and wetlands.

Location: In southwest Oregon approximately 5 miles north of Medford, just south of White City, Jackson County.

Description: Denman is a 1,780-acre wildlife area managed by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. It consists of both native and cultivated/planted grasslands, woodlands, and wetlands.

Ornithological Highlights: This area preserves remnants of the wetlands that were once more extensive in the Rogue Valley but are now quite rare, as well as other habitats of concern such as grasslands and oak woodlands. Notable wetland and/or riparian species include nesting Sora and Virginia Rails, Marsh Wrens, Yellow-breasted Chats, Cinnamon Teal, as well as many migrant and wintering waterfowl and wading birds. Black-necked Stilt have bred here at least once. Yellow-headed Blackbirds have bred here, and are regular in the spring. Grassland birds include Northern Harriers, White-tailed Kites (oak savannah), and Grasshopper Sparrows.

For more information on Denman Wildlife area, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA Database.

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42.4123044424 -122.834701538
Red Marker E.E. Wilson Wildlife Area
This is a 1,700-acre wildlife area managed by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. It is predominantly grass-shrub habitat -some native, mostly patches of cultivated grass-forb or food crop surrounded by an abundance of himalayan blackberry- with scattered small wetlands, ponds, and riparian and upland woodlands.

Location: Near Adair Village, 10 miles north of Corvallis on Highway 99W, west-central Willamette Valley.

Description: This is a 1,700-acre wildlife area managed by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. It is predominantly grass-shrub habitat--some native, mostly patches of cultivated grass-forb or food crop surrounded by an abundance of Himalayan Blackberry--with scattered small wetlands, ponds, and riparian and upland woodlands.

Ornithological Highlights: The site provides significant habitat for Yellow-breasted Chat, Western Bluebird, and Willow Flycatcher. Trumpeter Swans and Dusky Canada Geese use the ponds for roosting. Peregrine Falcon, Bald Eagle, and Red-Shouldered Hawk have also been observed here. About 195 species of birds have been seen in the Wildlife Area.

For more information on E.E. Wilson, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

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44.6706061651 -123.231925964
Red Marker East Sand Island
East Sand Island is a natural island near the mouth of the Columbia River. It is capped with dredge spoil at the east end, contains a stone jetty at the west end, and is surrounded by extensive sand and mud flats at low tide.

Location: About 5 miles upstream from the mouth of the Columbia River, closer to Washington than Oregon mainland.

Description: East Sand Island is a highly modified natural island, low-lying, long, and narrow, about 1 kilometer in length and about 200 meters wide at its widest, with an area of about 50 acres. It is composed entirely of coarse sand with a thin topsoil layer, capped with dredge spoil at the east end and a stone jetty at the west end. There is a large tidal pond near the west end, but otherwise the soil is generally well-drained. The island is densely vegetated in the midsection, with the interior covered with Scotch Broom, Hooker's Willow, Red Alder, and a few young Douglas Fir. The shoreline is dominated by European Beachgrass and American Dunegrass. Agricultural lands along the river and intertidal marshes in the estuary provide substantial habitat along the lower river, which is surrounded by extensive sand and mud flats at low tide.

Ornithological Highlights:  East Sand Island is the nesting site of the largest Caspian Tern colony in the world, as well as a breeding site for Double-crested and Brandt's Cormorants and several species of gulls. Small numbers of Pigeon Guillemots nest at the west end of the island.

The island is also a heavily used roost site and seasonal migration stopover for Brown Pelicans, Pelagic Cormorants, three species of loons, and a variety of ducks and geese. Shorebirds are abundant during spring and fall migration with substantial numbers overwintering in the estuary. Raptors occur as residents, migrants and/or wintering birds, with Bald Eagles relatively abundant. Peregrine Falcons are also present.

For more information on East Sand Island, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

46.26194 -123.9856
Red Marker Fern Ridge Reservoir
Fern Ridge Reservoir is a U. S. Corps of Engineers flood control project encompassing more than 12,000 acres. The lake and surrounding marshlands provide unique habitats attracting a variety of bird species.

Location: In the southern Willamette Valley, about 7 miles west of Eugene, Lane County.

Description: Fern Ridge Dam and Reservoir is operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as part of a system of thirteen multipurpose dams and reservoirs that make up the Willamette Valley Project. These 12,000 acres of lake and surrounding marshlands provide unique habitats attracting a variety of bird species.

Ornithological Highlights: Fern Ridge provides important breeding habitat for a small colony of Black Terns, marsh birds such as rails and bitterns, a variety of waterfowl, and a few shorebirds. Wintering and migrant populations making use of this site include Tundra Swan, Dusky Canada Goose, Greater White-fronted Goose, Northern Pintail, Great Egret, Ring-billed Gull, and several shorebirds. The following sensitive songbird species also utilize Fern Ridge: Purple Martin, Yellow-breasted Chat, Western Meadowlark, Willow Flycatcher, Western Bluebird, and Grasshopper Sparrow.

For more information on Fern Ridge, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.083721 -123.300574
Red Marker Fernhill Wetland
In the northwest Willamette Valley just south of the town of Forest Grove, Washington County. A wide variety of wetland and grassland bird species occur here, including large numbers of waterfowl and shorebirds.

Location: In the northwest Willamette Valley just south of the town of Forest Grove, in Washington County.

Description: This 243 acre site is composed largely of restored wetlands and moist soil habitats of now defunct sewage ponds. Fernhill is the focus of a proposed multi-million dollar project to continue the 150-200 acre restoration process and re-open the slough to the adjacent Tualatin River.

Ornithological Highlights:  Waterfowl populations are daily in the thousands from November through March. Shorebirds occur (at least 17 species recorded thus far) in numbers frequently exceeding 100 birds in spring, fall, and sometimes in winter.

For more information on Fernhill Wetlands, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

Links:

IBA of the month: Fernhill Wetlands

Klamath Bird Observatory Important Aquatic Bird Site Description


45.506828121 -123.08807373
Red Marker Goat Island
Goat Island is the largest island along the Oregon coast, and part of the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge. The island contains deep soils and a variety of native vegetation conducive to nesting seabird species.

Goat Island
Goat Island - Roy Lowe - USFWS

Location: The southernmost coastal IBA in Oregon, about 2 miles northwest of Brookings, just offshore of Harris Beach State Park, Curry County.

Description: At 21 acres, Goat Island is the largest island along the Oregon coast. It was the first unit comprising the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge, established in 1936. The island contains deep soils and a variety of native vegetation conducive to burrow-nesting seabird species.

Ornithological Highlights: Goat Island hosts 24% of the statewide nesting Leach's Storm-Petrels and more than 109,000 nesting seabirds comprising 11 species. The island serves as a night roost for thousands of Aleutian Canada geese in the spring and a wintering area for a small group of Dusky Canada geese.

For more information on Goat Island, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links

 

42.0653518782 -124.313220978
Red Marker Goose Lake and Garrett Ranch
Alkali lake and surrounding wetlands straddling the California/Oregon border in Lake County, Oregon.

Location: Southern Lake County, straddling the Oregon/California border.

Description: Shallow, expansive alkali lake with adjacent marshes and other surrounding habitats which significantly extend the utility of the area's numerous waterbird species. The last Hardstem bullrush marsh in Goose Lake Valley is found on private land just north of the lake.

Ornithological Highlights: Most other major lakes in the area are post-breeding areas (Summer Lake and Lake Abert), but shorebirds use Goose Lake as a breeding area. American avocets, Willets, and Killdeer nest on the south end of the lake and most likely produce more chicks than Lake Abert and Summer Lake combined. This may be explained by lower salinity, access to fresh water, and island habitats that make it difficult for mammalian predators to reach nests. Goose Lake is a significant staging area for migrating shorebirds, including over 10,000 American avocets, as well as Western and Clark's grebes, Tundra Swans, and American White Pelicans.

For more information on Goose Lake and Garrett Ranch IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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41.9851029 -120.5051248
Red Marker Government Island
This large 1,760-acre island in the Columbia River provides a variety of wildlife habitats with stands of willow, ash, and cottonwood interspersed among grasslands, ponds, and lakes.

Location: On the Columbia River just west of I-205, near the Portland Airport.

Description: This large 1,760-acre island provides a variety of wildlife habitats with stands of willow, ash, and cottonwood interspersed among grasslands, ponds, and lakes.

Ornithological Highlights: This site has hosted a large colony of Great Blue Herons for at least 10 years. In addition it has a wide variety of habitats used by a diverse array of birds.

For more information on Government Island, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.57941 -122.511694
Red Marker Green Ridge
This 15-mile long ridge runs north-south, with a very gradual slope to the east and a very steep slope to the west, which descends roughly 1,500 ft to the Metolius River.

Green Ridge Lookout

Location: About 12 miles east of the Cascades crest in central Oregon, north of Black Butte, southwest Jefferson County.

Description: This 15-mile long ridge runs north-south, with a very gradual slope to the east and a very steep slope to the west, which descends roughly 1,500 ft to the Metolius River. The ridge is mostly forested, but has some recent harvest units as well as a few small meadows and rock outcroppings.

Ornithological Highlights:  Trial counts conducted by HawkWatch International in fall 1994 tallied 1451 migrating raptors of 14 species in 267 hours of observation. There are hopes of establishing a permanent fall raptor monitoring station, banding site, and educational outreach effort on Green Ridge in cooperation with the Deschutes National Forest, HawkWatch International, and other partners. This ridge is also host to a great variety of landbirds during breeding and migration seasons.

For more information on Green Ridge, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.5621082121 -121.149330139
Red Marker Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge
Hart Mountain NAR is a 278,000-acre refuge in southeastern Lake County, 30 miles northeast of Lakeview. The land consists of extensive high-quality sage-steppe and grassland, sparsely laced with deciduous riparian habitat and bordered on the west by a steep, rocky west face.

Location: Hart Mountain NAR sits atop a massive fault block in South-central Oregon, about 30 miles northeast of the city of Lakeview in southeastern Lake County.

Description: This 278,000-acre refuge, established in 1936 by Franklin D. Roosevelt, consists of extensive sage-steppe and grassland bordered on the west by a 30-mile rimrock escarpment, which looms above the Warner Basin to the west.   The area contains some of the most extensive and high-quality sage-steppe habitat in the state, along with dry and wet upland meadows, riparian aspen and willow stands, mixed deciduous shrub habitat, and snowpocket Aspen groves.

Ornithological Hightlights: Hart Mountain NAR was established in 1936 by FDR to provide habitat for Pronghorm Antelope, Greater Sage Grouse, and other sagebrush obligates.  This area comprises one of the most extensive and high-quality sage steppe habitats in Oregon, with a full compliment of wildlife species, including Greater Sage Grouse.  300 species of wildlife have been documented here, and the documented 239 species of birds include: Short-eared Owl, Black-chinned Hummingbird, Common Nighthawk, Horned Lark, Common Raven, Vesper Sparrow, Brewer’s Sparrow, Savannah Sparrow, Lark Sparrow, Cassin’s Finch, Sage Thrasher, Turkey Vulture, Northern Harrier, Great Horned Owl, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Common Poorwill, Western Wood Pewee, Chipping Sparrow, Gray Flycatcher, Bushtit, Townsend’s Solitaire, Western Meadowlark, Lazuli Bunting, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Rough-legged Hawk, and American Kestrel.

For more information, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links

Hart Mountain NAR Marilyn Stinnett
Hart Mountain NAR Marilyn Stinnett


42.5186751742 -119.643859863
Red Marker Heceta Bank
This IBA includes Heceta Bank, Perpetua Bank, Stonewall Bank, and surrounding waters. Heceta Bank is an underwater seamount where upwellings bring food to the surface for a diversity of seabirds.

Location: Approximately 15-30 miles off the central Oregon coast, in Lincoln and Lane counties.

Description: This IBA includes Heceta Bank, Perpetua Bank, Stonewall Bank, and surrounding waters. Heceta Bank is an underwater seamount approximately 10 miles wide (east-west) and 15 miles long (north-south) at a depth of about 30-60 fathoms. Perpetua Bank and Stonewall Bank are less dramatic features of the same large ridge extending southwest from Newport. Upwelling caused by the interaction of sea currents and seafloor topography, as well as the activity of fishing boats, are suspected to be responsible for bringing food to the surface and drawing the diversity of seabirds found here.

Ornithological Highlights: Large numbers of many seabirds can be found in this area. Highlights (primarily from chartered pelagic trips) include Short-tailed Albatross, Black-footed Albatross, Pink-footed Shearwater, Northern Fulmar, and Cassin's Auklet.

For more information on Heceta Bank, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.0096078265 -124.246444702
Red Marker Horse Creek Meadow Wildlife Area
An 80 acre meadow and most of the roughly 2500-acre surrounding Horse Creek watershed near Grants Pass.

Horse Creek Meadow Wildlife Area

Location: Roughly 18 miles west of Grants Pass in the Siskiyou National Forest, central Josephine County.

Description: The featured meadow is about 80 acres in size, though this IBA includes most of the roughly 2500-acre Horse Creek watershed. The meadow consists of open grass, forb, and sedge areas as well as patches of willow and other deciduous shrubs. The remainder of the basin is predominantly forested in various stages of succession.

Ornithological Highlights: This IBA is one of very few in Oregon identified specifically for the high numbers and diversity of songbirds. This site is part of the Institute for Bird Population’s (IBP) Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program and has been operated from 1987 to the present (excepting 1988).  A total of 105 species have been observed in the area, including 70 species banded. The birds banded include local breeding birds as well as those believed to be dispersants and migrants from the Horse Creek watershed and beyond, visiting these productive meadows to fuel up before migration.

For more information on Horse Creek Meadow, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.44858 -123.67128
Red Marker Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve
Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve is a 650 acre complex of wetlands and uplands located in the middle of the Tualatin River Watershed.

Location: In the northwest Willamette Valley in Hillsboro, Washington County.

Description: Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve is a 650 acre complex of wetlands and uplands located in the middle of the Tualatin River Watershed. It includes a riparian forest zone along the Tualatin River, forested wetlands, oak groves, a mixed Douglas fir/big-leaf maple woodland, ponds, marshes, slough and meadow areas of predominantly reed canary grass.

Ornithological Highlights: Jackson Bottom Wetlands Preserve provides habitat for a wide variety of birds both in the nesting season and during migration. During migration the preserve supports thousands of waterfowl including Dusky Canada Goose, Tundra Swan, Northern Pintail, Canvasback, Blue-winged Teal, Green-winged Teal, and Bufflehead, as well as spring migrant songbirds such as Western Tanager, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, and Townsend's Warbler. Rare birds spotted on the preserve include Black-crowned Night Heron, Short-eared Owl, Olive-sided Flycatcher, and Rufous Hummingbird.

For more information on Jackson Bottom Wetlands, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.5113995047 -122.987136841
Red Marker Killin Wetlands (Cedar Canyon Marsh)
A remnant of the Willamette Valley scrub-shrub marsh present before pioneers settled the area in the 1850s.

Location: Three miles west of Banks, central Washington County.

Description: Killin Wetlands, roughly 373 acres, is located in the bottomland of Park Farms Creek. Wetland habitats include reed canarygrass, cattails, willows, sedges, and rushes. Edge habitat is comprised of mature 2nd-growth Douglas-fir, Western redcedar, Oregon white oak, bigleaf maple, alder species & other deciduous trees and shrubs.

Ornithological Highlights: Killin Wetlands has one of the highest densities of American Bittern in the state, easily visible from late January thru mid-May before the vegetation grows taller. Numerous species of shorebirds exceeding 100 individuals are frequent here in spring and fall. A count of 200 Greater Yellowlegs here on 30 Mar 1997 is one of Oregon's top counts.

For more information on Killin Wetlands, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

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45.6142775611 -123.145751953
Red Marker Klamath Canyon
This area consists of the last 2 miles of the Klamath River Canyon before it enters California, including the river, riparian area, and upslope oak-pine woodlands in the canyon.

Location: On the Klamath River just above the California state line, southwest Klamath County.

Description: This area consists of the last 2 miles of the Klamath River Canyon before it enters California, including the river, riparian area, and upslope oak-pine woodlands in the canyon. Both the riparian willow and upslope oak-pine woodlands are in good condition.

Ornithological Highlights: Lewis's Woodpeckers and Willow Flycatchers, both species of concern on multiple watchlists, are common breeding birds here.  

For more information on Klamath Canyon, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

42.01931 -122.11779
Red Marker Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge
A 40,000 acre refuge comprised mainly of grassy meadows and marshlands.

Location: Fifteen miles east of Crater Lake, central Klamath County.

Description: This refuge, currently over 40,000 acres in size, is composed of roughly 95% grassy meadows and marsh and 5% forest.

Ornithological Highlights: Klamath Marsh hosts approximately 50% of the western U.S. Yellow Rail breeding population, and roughly 6% of Oregon's breeding population of Greater Sandhill Crane. Forster's Tern and Black Tern are also known to breed here. Many thousands of waterfowl are commonly present during migration; up to 37,000 waterfowl were recorded in March 2001. There are several records of Least Bittern here, a naturally rare species in Oregon. Shorebirds are present in spring, and a count of 61 on 12 April 1993 is one of the highest in Oregon.

Tundra Swans DB H
For more information on Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.883162 -121.6896
Red Marker Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area
Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area is a group of wetlands, marshes, and prairies totaling over 6,000 acres in northeast Oregon.

Location: Roughly 5 miles southeast of La Grande in central Union County, in the southwest Grande Ronde Valley.

Description: This 6,020-acre Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife property is one of the largest remaining wetlands in NE Oregon.  It includes a variety of wetland types (open water, emergent wetland, scrub shrub, wet meadow) as well as prairie grassland, upland shrub and conifer habitats.

Ornithological Highlights: During spring migration 15,000 to 20,000 ducks and geese are typically present including hundreds of Greater White-fronted Goose and small numbers of Snow Goose and Ross’s Goose. During June and July Black-necked Stilts and American Avocets nest on the area making it one of the only sites in northeast Oregon where these shorebirds nest. The area also hosts nesting Black-crowned Night-Herons, Sandhill Cranes and Long-billed Curlews.  Access to the area is limited, but several county roads offer good viewing, especially with a spotting scope.

For more information on Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the national IBA database.

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45.2634093552 -118.035736084
Red Marker Lake Abert
Lake Abert, in south-central Oregon, is one of Oregon's largest lakes.

Location: South-central Oregon, south-central Lake County, about 30 miles north of Lakeview, on the west side of Highway 395.

Description: With 57 square miles of surface area, Lake Abert is one of Oregon's largest lakes. It is the lowest part of a 860 square mile closed basin, and part of a 49,900-acre Area of Critical Environmental Concern designated by BLM.

Ornithological Highlights: One of only a handful of inland nest sites for Snowy Plover in Oregon. Hosts tens of thousands of Eared Grebes, American Avocets, Wilson's Phalaropes, and Red-necked Phalaropes during fall migration. Over 12,000 gulls and 20,000 ducks have been recorded here.

For more information on Lake Abert, please see the Technical Site Report in the National Audubon Society database.

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42.6263 -120.2333
Red Marker Lewis & Clark and JB Hansen NWR
A 38,000-acre refuge in the Columbia River between Portland and Astoria, which contains more than 10,000 acres of intertidal freshwater marsh and swamp.

Location: On the Columbia River between Portland and Astoria.

Description: This 38,000-acre refuge encompasses more than 40% of the Columbia River estuary and includes numerous islands and bars and extensive mudflats, tidal marshes, and tidal swamps. The refuge encloses part of the largest remaining marsh in western Oregon- more than 10,000 acres- and is an important rearing area for anadromous fish.

Ornithological Highlights: There were 8 bald eagle nest sites here in 2003, and at least that many more eagle pairs nest nearby and forage in the refuge. There is a Great Blue Heron nesting colony at Karlson Island that typically consists of 75-100 nests. The refuge is an important wintering site for Greater Scaup and other ducks, Canada Goose, and Tundra Swan. Many thousands of gulls forage here during February/March when smelt are running, and thousands of Caspian terns from the E. Sand Island colony forage in the lower part of the refuge. More than 10,000 shorebirds may be present at any given time during spring migration.

For more information on Lewis & Clark and JB Hansen NWR, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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46.2239 -123.6316
Red Marker Little Deschutes River/Crescent Creek
A designated Wild and Scenic riparian area in Klamath County, southern Oregon.

Location: Little Deschutes River and Crescent Creek, north-central/north-eastern Klamath County west of route 97.

Description: Tentatively from the confluence of Little Deschutes River and Crescent Creek, upstream along both streams to where they cross Hwy 58, and including adjacent riparian habitats.

Ornithological Highlights: These stretches of streams and associated riparian habitat comprise the bulk of the known Oregon population of Northern Waterthrush.

For more information on Little Deschutes River/Crescent Creek, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.5293 -121.6517
Red Marker Mack Reef
This site off the coast of southern Oregon is comprised of submerged reef habitat and numerous offshore rocks and small islands.
Mack Reef - Roy W. Lowe, USFWS
Mack Reef - Roy W. Lowe, USFWS

Location: On the southern Oregon coast just south of Pistol River State Park and Crook Point in Curry County, approximately 11 miles south of Gold Beach.

Description: This site is comprised of more than 25 rocks, islands, and sea stacks that provide valuable seabird breeding habitat. Habitat varies from small barren rocks to large rocks covered with deep soils and vegetation.

Ornithological Highlights: More than 200,000 nesting seabirds comprising 10 species make use of this site, including approximately 43% of the Oregon breeding population of Leach's Storm-Petrels.

For more information on Mack Reef, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.2397 -124.4126
Red Marker Malheur National Wildlife Refuge
This area is one of the premiere sites for birds and birding in the U.S. The refuge consists of over 187,000 acres of habitat which include wetlands, riparian areas, meadows, and uplands.

Location: In the center of the southeast quarter of the state, 30 miles south of Burns in central Harney County.

Description: This area is one of the premiere sites for birds and birding in the U.S. The refuge consists of over 187,000 acres of habitat which include wetlands, riparian areas, meadows, and uplands. Refuge lands are configured in roughly a "T" shape, 39 miles wide and 40 miles long.

Ornithological Highlights: Malheur's varied habitats, abundant resources, and location on the Pacific Flyway are utilized by a variety of migratory and resident birds. Over 320 species of birds have been observed at Malheur, including numerous watch-listed species such as Western Snowy Plover, Long-billed Curlew, Franklin's Gull, Short-eared Owl, Greater Sage-Grouse, Bobolink, Trumpeter Swan, and Brewer's Sparrow.

The refuge's riparian habitat supports the highest known densities of Willow Flycatcher, up to 20% of the world's population of White-faced Ibis, and significant breeding populations of American White Pelican and Greater Sandhill Crane. Breeding populations on the refuge also include a variety of gulls and terns and hundreds of pairs of various duck species. The first Oregon breeding record of Cattle Egret came from Malheur Lake in the mid-1980s. Black-crowned Night-Heron pairs nesting on the refuge generally number in the hundreds.

During migration, the Refuge regularly supports hundreds of thousands of waterfowl and tens of thousands of shorebirds, including a significant proportion of the total populations of several species. Malheur Refuge is also a winter concentration point for raptors of many species.

Thousands of birders come to the refuge annually to take part in the spectacle, whether they come for the waterfowl, songbirds, or both. Due to the high birder coverage and concentrated bird habitat Malheur Headquarters may have the highest all-time bird list of any single location in Oregon.

For more information on Malheur, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.26535 -118.84623
Red Marker Marbled Murrelet IBA
80,000 acre land and marine-based parcel which houses high concentrations of Marbled Murrelets both on the water and in prime intact old-growth forest.

Location: This central coast IBA is composed of Siuslaw National Forest land, two BLM managed areas- Rock Creek Wilderness and Cummins Creek Wilderness-, Pine Tree Conservation Society land, and the Audubon Society of Portland-owned Ten Mile Creek Sanctuary. The Heceta Head Lighthouse marks the southwestern edge.

Description: This IBA captures the largest intact stand of coastal temperate rainforest in the lower 48 states, a habitat of Douglas Fir, Western Hemlock, and the massive Sitka Spruce whose moss-blanketed branches provide nesting platforms for the Marbled Murrelet. Paul Engelmeyer, Coastal IBA Coordinator, manages the land for Portland Audubon with a litany of land management goals: improve forest canopy, encourage wildlife habitat diversity, encourage succession to old-growth forest characteristics, create a model for community based protection and restoration efforts, and to influence Siuslaw National Forest land management programs to shift toward a protection and restoration strategy for the surrounding forest. 

Ornithological Highlights: The highest concentration of at-sea Murrelets occurs between Florence and Newport and the land included in the MAMU IBA contains more than 50 detected nest sites. 
Northern Spotted Owls also nest within the IBA, and both of these ESA-listed species continue to face significant threats throughout their Pacific Northwest forest habitat. 

The forests of the MAMU IBA additionally host a variety of songbirds including Hermit Warbler, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Varied and Hermit Thrush, Hutton’s Vireo, Pacific-slope Flycatcher, Common Yellowthroat, Black-headed Grosbeak, and MacGillivray’s Warbler.

For more information on Marbled Murrelet IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.2213377234 -124.096755981
Red Marker Mount Pisgah
Mount Pisgah (Howard Buford Recreation Area), is over 2,300 acres in size, consisting of grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, and a small amount of stream and streamside habitat in the southern Willamette Valley.

Location: Southern Willamette Valley, southeast of Eugene/Springfield, between the Middle and Coast Forks of the Willamette River, central Lane County.

Description: Mount Pisgah (Howard Buford Recreation Area), is over 2,300 acres in size, consisting of grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, and a small amount of stream and streamside habitat. This white oak savannah is an Oregon Conservation Strategy Conservation Opportunity Area.

Ornithological Highlights: The grass/shrub open areas of the site comprise what may be the largest single concentration of the "Oregon" Vesper Sparrow in the Willamette Valley, perhaps two dozen pairs. This subspecies of Vesper Sparrow is listed as "Critical" on the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Sensitive Species list, and is considered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as a Bird of Conservation Consern in Bird Conservation Region 5.

For more information on Mount Pisgah and Howard Buford Recreation Area, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.0057 -122.9645
Red Marker Mud Slough
440-acre parcel located in the Willamette Valley west of Salem, approximately 2.5 acres west of Rickreall.

Location: A privately-owned 440-acre parcel in the Willamette Valley west of Salem, approximately 2.5 acres west of Rickreall.

Description: This wetland complex features a range of diverse shallow water habitats and vegetation from small native sedges to cattails and rushes, willow patches, restored native prairie, and a single deeper pond. 335 acres are held in a Wetland Reserve Program, and 106.25 acres are held in a Willamette Valley Mitigation Bank. In 2005, a Conservation and Management Plan was written for the property, and outlines continued management of the site for a diversity of habitats and associated wildlife. The wetland area extends about 1.5 miles south from Farmer Road and roughly 0.5 miles east from the railroad tracks.

Ornithological Highlights: Hundreds of shorebirds use the area during spring and fall migration and throughout winter.  Primary migrant species are Western Sandpiper, Dunlin, Greater Yellowlegs, and Long-billed Dowitcher. Primary winter species are Dunlin, Greater Yellowlegs, and Long-billed Dowitcher.  Breeding marsh birds include Sora, Virginia Rail, American Bittern. Rare breeders include Wilson's Phalarope and Yellow-headed Blackbird.

For more information on Mud Slough IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.9555504 -123.2015742
Red Marker Necanicum Estuary
On the northern Oregon coast where the Necanicum River enters the Pacific Ocean.

Location: On the northern Oregon coast where the Necanicum River enters the Pacific Ocean, at Seaside, Clatsop County.

Description: The Necanicum and Neawanna Rivers flow into this estuary, which includes submerged lands and a large tidal flat surrounded by dunes, sitka spruce forest and residential areas. The estuary is approximately 451 acres in area and has a watershed of approximately 87 square miles.

Ornithological Highlights: Snowy Plovers nested on the north spit in 2000 and 2002; Bald Eagles nest in the Sahali spruce forest on the east edge; 10-20,000 Calidris sandpipers (mostly Western Sandpipers), 500+ Semipalmated Plovers, small numbers of Whimbrel, and occasionally Long-billed Curlew use the flats during migrations.

For more information on Necanicum Estuary, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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46.0129 -123.9214
Red Marker Nestucca Bay
This area includes the Bay and the adjacent lowlands south of Pacific City.

Location: North-coastal Oregon, Tillamook County, South of Pacific City, just off Highway 101.

Description: This area includes the Bay and the adjacent lowlands extending from populated Pacific City to the undeveloped, sandy peninsula of Bob Straub State Park. It contains a multitude of habitats including pastures, grasslands, woodlands, tidal marsh and mudflats, freshwater bogs, and forested lagg. The estuary is approximately 1176 acres in area and has a watershed of approximately 322 square miles.

Ornithological Highlights: During winter months the pastures around Nestucca Bay harbor the entire Semidi Islands population (about 130 birds) of Aleutian Canada Geese, as well as one of the few coastal wintering populations of Dusky Canada Geese. Six subspecies of Canada Geese winter here.

For more information on Nestucca Bay NWR, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.1826 -123.9527
Red Marker Netarts Bay
An estuary on the north coast of Oregon at Netarts.

Location: On the northern Oregon coast at Netarts, Tillamook County, adjacent to Cape Lookout State Park.

Description: This estuary comprises over 2,300 acres of water at high tide and over 1,500 acres of exposed tideland at low tide. The extreme fluctuation of the tide makes this an ideal foraging area for crustaceans and other invertebrates due to the flux of nutrients between the tides, and the accessibility to the food sources during low tide. Cape Lookout's narrow, cliff-edged headland juts two miles straight out into the Pacific Ocean.

Ornithological Highlights: Netarts Bay hosted an average of 43% of Oregon's wintering population of Black Brant during January counts 1996-2002. During two counts of shorebirds during 1988-1991, the peak count at Netarts Bay was 4,818 shorebirds in fall.

For more information on Netarts Bay, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.4023 -123.9457
Red Marker New River
This area includes roughly 10 miles of the New River between Floras Lake and the southern Oregon coast.

Location: On the southern Oregon coast, west and north of Langlois, crossing the Curry-Coos county line.

Description: This area includes roughly 10 miles of the New River between Floras Lake and the Pacific Ocean. Approximately 60% of this area is owned and managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the remainder being private, state, and county land. The river runs parallel to the ocean just behind the foredune.

Ornithological Highlights: Snowy Plover is present year round. During spring, up to 20,000 Aleutian Canada Geese and tens of thousands of shorebirds (peaks up to 100,000) can be observed. This area is one of the few tundra swan wintering sites along the Oregon Coast.

For more information on New River, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.9719 -124.4657
Red Marker Oregon Canyon and Trout Creek Mountains
These two ranges in SE Oregon are largely owned and managed by BLM and straddle Harney and Malheur Counties.

Location: These two mountain ranges are located in far southeast Oregon in Harney and Malheur counties and straddle the Oregon-Nevada border.

Description: This IBA is one of three Globally recognized IBAs in Oregon, a designation based on the presence of Greater Sage Grouse. It includes: aspen woodlands; mountain mahogany woodlands; savannah; adjacent diverse shrublands and wet meadows. Much of the land in the Oregon Canyon Mountains and Trout Creek Mountains is owned by BLM and designated as Wilderness Study Area.  The Trout Creeks also contain two citizen-proposed WSAs (Table Mountain and Catlow Peak).  Streams in this area are somewhat degraded by grazing.

Ornithological Highlights: These woodlands are the primary location in Oregon for probable or confirmed nesting of Gray-headed Junco and Virginia's Warbler. This is one of a very few locations in southeastern Oregon for breeding Northern Goshawk, Black-throated Gray Warbler, Pine Siskin, Mountain Chickadee, Red Crossbill, Bushtit, Hermit Thrush, and MacGillivray's Warbler as well as a significant number of active Greater Sage Grouse Leks (a Warranted but Precluded ESA-candidate species).

For more information on Oregon Canyon/Trout Creek Mountains IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links

Trout Creek Mountains BLM
Trout Creek Mountains BLM
42.0914 -118.1819
Red Marker Oregon Caves - Bigelow Lakes
This area of about 1000 acres in southwest Oregon is comprised of high mountain lakes surrounded by mature conifer forest, wet meadow/alder brushfield, and some rock outcrops.

Location: In southwest Oregon, in the Siskiyou National Forest about 15 miles ESE of Cave Junction, Josephine County.

Description: This area of about 1000 acres is comprised of high mountain lakes surrounded by mature conifer forest, wet meadow/alder brushfield, and some rock outcrops.

Ornithological Highlights: Spotted Owls, Long-eared Owls, and Flammulated Owls have all been detected in the area. Lincoln's Sparrow, Varied Thrush, Gray Jay, and White-headed Woodpecker, all rare species in southwest Oregon, have also been found here during the breeding season. During late summer dispersal and fall migration, large numbers of passerines make a stop in this area to forage and "tank up" for further travels southward.

For more information on Oregon Caves- Bigelow Lakes, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.0932 -123.3894
Red Marker Orford Reef
A group of rocks off the southern Oregon coast which provide valuable seabird habitat.

Location: Off the southern Oregon coast, offshore and south of Cape Blanco, Curry County.

Description:  This site includes eight major rocks on the Orford Reef including Best Rock, Long Brown Rock, Unnamed Rock, Square White Rock, Seal Rock, Conical White Rock, West Conical Rock, and Arch Rock. These rocks are devoid of soil and vegetation except for Best Rock, which contains scattered patches of soil and low vegetation.

Ornithological Highlights: This site supports more than 39,000 nesting seabirds and 5% of the Common Murre nesting population in Oregon.

For more information on Orford Reef, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.7852 -124.6027
Red Marker Quartzville Wild and Scenic River
A western Cascades river utilized by a significant number of Harlequin Ducks.

Location: In the western Cascades, Quartzville Creek flows into Green Peter Reservoir, northeast of Sweet Home, northeast Linn County.

Description: Quartzville Creek flows over a bedrock and cobble bed and has a very high level of autotrophic productivity (the forest canopy does not extend over the bed). Though much of the adjacent land has been managed for industrial forestry, significant low-elevation old-growth conifer forest remains along some parts of the creek. The Quartzville Access Road also provides access to the Middle Santiam Wilderness, a large non-wilderness trail system, and a staffed fire lookout (Coffin Mountain).

Ornithological Highlights: A significant portion (20-25%) of Oregon's breeding population of Harlequin Ducks are thought to occur in the Quartzville Creek basin, representing the heart of the Oregon Cascades breeding range. In addition, there are resident Bald Eagles, 6-8 pairs of Osprey, and 10+ pairs of American Dipper.

For more information on Quartzville Wild and Scenic River, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.5874 -122.3713
Red Marker Redfish Rocks
Along the southern Oregon coast, a cluster of five bare-rock islands jut out of the Pacific Ocean south of Port Orford.

Location: On the southern Oregon coast about 4 miles south of Port Orford and about a mile west of Humbug Mountain State Park, Curry County.

Description: This cluster of five bare-rock islands is one of Oregon’s first two pilot Marine Reserves.

Ornithological Highlights: These rocks have a breeding population of Common Murres exceeding 20,000 birds. Other species that breed here include Pelagic and Brandt’s Cormorant, Western Gull, Tufted Puffin, Pigeon Guillemot, and Black Oystercatcher. The thriving nearshore marine ecosystem provides not only for foraging birds during the breeding season, but also provides for the many pelicans, shearwaters, murrelets, storm-petrels, terns, cormorants, gulls, grebes, scoters, and loons that migrate along or overwinter on our coastline.

For more information on Redfish Rocks, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.6988 -124.4755
Red Marker Ross Island
A four-island complex in the Willamette River within the Portland metropolitan area.

Location: Located in Portland between the Ross Island and Sellwood bridges in the Willamette River. It is alongside the Oaks Bottom Wildlife Area and visible from within Oaks Bottom and along the bike/hike path at its edge.

Description: A 404-acre island complex separated from Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge by the narrow Holgate Channel. Includes Ross, Hardtack, East, and Toe Islands.

Ornithological Highlights:  More than 100 bird species use the Island along their Pacific Flyway migratory path. On East Island, a rookery of Great Blue Herons has been present for decades, at one time housing as many as 66 nests. A pair of Bald Eagles has nested and raised young on the Island since the 1990s. A floating passerby could hope to encounter eagles, herons, osprey, kingfishers, beaver, river otter, and a wide array of songbirds, shorebirds, gulls, and waterfowl.

For more information on Ross Island, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

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45.4898 -122.6634
Red Marker Saddle Mountain State Natural Area
Saddle Mountain SNA in Clatsop County contains the highest peak in the north Coast Range and contains remnant old growth forest, which hosts Marbled Murrelets.

Location: North of Highway 26 and just east of US 101, a double-peaked saddle of pillow basalt rises 3,283 feet out of the surrounding forest to form the highest peak in the north Coast Range and the highest in NW Oregon.

Description: Saddle Mountain, previously known to Native Americans as Swallalhoost, is itself is a registered Oregon National Heritage site.  The surrounding state natural area has been designated an Important Bird Area for both Marbled Murrelet and Sooty Grouse (formerly Blue Grouse).  A rigorous 2.5 mile hike with an elevation gain of 1,650 feet affords sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, and on a clear day, the Olympics to the north.  It provides a spectacular nearly 360-degree view of Oregon State Park-owned intact forest upon which Northern Spotted Owl and Marbled Murrelet rely, and beyond that, a surrounding mosaic of clear-cut state forest and industrial forest.

Ornithological Highlights: Marbled Murrelets nest in the old growth forest on the north side. As many as 12 individuals have been seen during early morning censuses conducted in each year in late June from 1991 to present. Other breeding species include Blue Grouse, Hammond's Flycatcher, and Hermit Warbler. It may also have breeding Calliope Hummingbirds.

For more information on Saddle Mountain State Natural Area, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.9676691 -123.6845785
Red Marker Salmon River Estuary
A natural estuary on the northern Oregon coast where the Salmon River meets the Pacific Ocean.

Location: On the northern Oregon coast where the Salmon River meets the Pacific Ocean, near the borders of Tillamook and Lincoln counties.

Description: The Salmon River is one of the few relatively undeveloped estuaries on our coast.  The IBA encompasses the roughly 200-acre riverine estuary up to mean high water, and though relatively small in size, more than half the estuary remains tidal marsh. The entire estuary and its associated wetlands are included in the U.S. Forest Service's Cascade Head Scenic
Research Area.

Ornithological Highlights: The Salmon River Estuary was nominated as an Important Bird Area for Brown Pelican, Bald Eagle, Peregrine Falcon, and for the presence of 1,000 or more shorebirds (mostly Western Sandpipers) at a given time.

For more information on Salmon River Estuary, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.035 -123.9875
Red Marker Sauvie Island Wildlife Area
An island at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers consisting of riparian areas, wetlands, savannahs, pastures, and mixed woodlands.

Sauvie Island - tm

Location: The island is in both Columbia and Multnomah Counties approximately 12 miles northwest of downtown Portland. It is bordered by the Willamette River to the south, Columbia River to the east and Multnomah Channel to the west.

Description: The Sauvie Island IBA includes two distinct parcels: the bulk of it is 12,000-acres of wetlands, savannah, cottonwood bottomlands, and upland Oregon White Oak forest managed by ODFW as a Wildlife Area.  On the southwest side of the island, Oregon State Parks owns and manages a 180-acre parcel that packs in nearly all of the native habitats found elsewhere on the island.

Ornithological Highlights: Of the 486 bird species found in Oregon, a remarkable 250 of these have been known to use Sauvie Island.  Over-wintering waterfowl can number in excess of 200,000 ducks, geese, and swans.  Autumn brings migrating Sandhill cranes, Snow geese, Tundra swans, Cackling and Canada geese.  Great Blue Heron and Osprey nest on the island, and Bald eagles both breed and congregate in winter along with wintering Red-tailed Hawks, Northern Harriers, Peregrine Falcons, and the less common Rough-legged Hawks and Merlin. Shorebird numbers have reached 30,000. Three species of birds once common and now rare or unusual on Sauvie Island include the Lewis Woodpecker, Western Meadowlark, and (Streaked) Horned Lark.

For more information on Sauvie Island Wildlife Area, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.7323 -122.8038
Red Marker Siletz Bay
Siletz Bay and estuary is located on the north-central Oregon coast about 4 miles south of Lincoln City.

Location: On the north-central Oregon coast, about 4 miles south of Lincoln City, northern Lincoln County.

Description: Includes Siletz Bay as well as the Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Habitats include submerged areas (water), mudflats, sandflats, and lower salt marshes.

Ornithological Highlights: Counts at this site have surpassed 100 Brown Pelicans, 5,000 waterfowl, 1,000 shorebirds, and 50 Caspian Terns. Occasionally, usually due to large schools of anchovy entering the bay, huge pulses of gulls, pelicans, and other species swarm into the bay to make use of the bountiful resources. Great Blue Heron and other wading birds use the bay and there is a small heron rookery on the refuge. Virginia Rail and Sora make use of the freshwater / brackish wetlands and tidal marsh / meadow-nesting species such as Savannah Sparrow, Marsh Wren and Common Yellowthroat are abundant. A diversity of raptors such as Osprey, Northern Harrier, Bald Eagle, and Red-tailed Hawk are commonly observed hunting prey withing the marshes and mudflats.

For more information on Siletz Bay, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.909136 -124.017765
Red Marker Siltcoos Estuary
This small estuary is located at the mouth of Siltcoos River, the outflow of Siltcoos Lake, southern Lane County coast.

Location: On the central Oregon coast, at the outlet of the Siltcoos River to the Pacific Ocean, about 8 miles south of Florence, in southern Lane County.

Description: This 45 acre estuary is located at the mouth of the Siltcoos River, the outflow of Siltcoos Lake. The estuary is wide, open, and flat with the Sitcoos River meandering throughout. Because of its low development and lack of maintained jetties or channels, it is classified as a natural estuary.

Ornithological Highlights: Wintering location for Snowy Plover. Other reported species here include Bufflehead, California Gull, Caspian Tern, Clark's Grebe, Common Loon, Great Blue Heron, Green Heron, Long-billed Curlew, Red-necked Grebe, and Virginia Rail.

For more information on Siltcoos Estuary, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.875 -124.1506
Red Marker Siltcoos Lake
At 3,164 acres, Siltcoos Lake is the largest freshwater lake on the Oregon coast.

Location: About 3 miles inland on the central Oregon coast, 7 miles south of Florence, southern Lane County.

Description: At 3,164 acres with 28 miles of shoreline, Siltcoos Lake is the largest freshwater lake on the Oregon coast. Over 80% of the lake is less than 15 feet deep and supports abundant growth of aquatic plants and animals.

Ornithological Highlights: Siltcoos Lake is regularly used by more than 2,000 waterfowl during winter and migration months. This site hosted 40-89% of Oregon's coastal winter population of American Coots during 1986-2002 January censuses.

For more information on Siltcoos Lake, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.8735 -124.0918
Red Marker Silver Falls State Park
Located near Silverton in Marion County, this is the largest state park in Oregon.

Location: A temperate rainforest near Silverton, Oregon in Marion County, 26 miles from Salem and just west of the Cascade Range.

Description: At over 9000 acres, the largest State Park in Oregon also has some of the last remaining low-elevation old growth coniferous forest in the Western Cascade Mountain foothills. Today, conifer forest in a full range of seral conditions can be found within or just outside of the park. Silver Creek and its tributaries are unusual examples of fairly intact foothill streams of this region. 

Ornithological Highlights: The park has within its boundaries pairs of all three North American Strix species owls. It almost certainly represents the lowest elevation breeding site for Great Gray Owl in western Oregon.

For more information on Silver Falls State Park IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.8648277 -122.629913
Red Marker Silvies River Floodplain
An area of flood-irrigated meadows and haylands between Burns, Oregon and Malheur Lake in Harney County, southeastern Oregon.

Location: The Silvies River Floodplain is an area of flood-irrigated meadows and haylands 20 miles southeast of Burns, draining into Malheur Lake in southeastern Oregon.

Description: The Silvies River area was historically a shallow, slow moving river system of sloughs and swales interspersed with meadows. In wet years, the flooding banks of the Silvies River creates an extensive wetland system in the valley. This region is characterized by miles of privately owned grasslands and open pasture, with some sagebrush uplands scattered throughout.

Ornithological Highlights: Silvies River supports nesting Sandhill Crane, colonies of Great Egrets, White-faced Ibis, Double-crested Cormorant, Black-crowned Night Heron, Snowy Egret, and hundreds of nesting shorebirds and ducks. Peak migration counts include 300,000 spring-staging Snow and Ross' Geese, 1,000,000 ducks, 10,000 swans, 12,000 Lesser Sandhill Cranes, and 300 spring-staging Bald Eagles.

For more information on the Silvies River Floodplain IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.5049249 -118.8588949
Red Marker Siskiyou Crest
The area includes roughly 10-15 miles of the Siskiyou Mountains crest area in southwestern Oregon.

Location: In the Siskiyou Mountains, southwest Oregon near the California border, roughly from Mt. Ashland west-southwest to Maple Dell Gap, and including Wagner Butte, Grouse Gap, MacDonald Peak, Red Mountain, Wrangle Gap, Silver Fork Gap, Dutchman’s Peak, and Yellowjacket Ridge.

Description: The area includes roughly 10-15 miles of the Siskiyou Mountains crest area in Oregon; continuation of the IBA into California is being considered. Dominant habitats are meadows and conifer forest. The diverse array of meadows are composed of grass, sedge, deciduous and/or evergreen shrubs, and small trees, and many have a small stream or other water source.

Ornithological Highlights:  The mountain meadows are important post-breeding habitat for many species; Rufous Hummingbird, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and Dark-eyed Junco in particular form impressive congregations. A small population of White-headed Woodpeckers is present in the conifer forests here, the only population known west of the Cascades in Oregon. Other species of interest include breeding Fox Sparrow, Green-tailed Towhee, Lincoln's Sparrow, and possibly Calliope Hummingbird. The Dutchman Peak area is the best known site for fall hawk migration in the Siskiyous.

For more information on Siskiyou Crest, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.0648 -122.7873
Red Marker Siuslaw River Estuary
This IBA includes submerged lands, tidelands, and lower salt marshes of the Siuslaw River from Duncan Inlet downstream to the mouth of the river on the central Oregon coast.

Location: The Siuslaw River estuary is located on the central Oregon coast at Florence, Lane County. The estuary is approximately 3060 acres in area and has a watershed of approximately 4560 square miles.

Description: This IBA includes submerged lands, tidelands, and lower salt marshes of the Siuslaw River from Duncan Inlet downstream to the mouth of the river.

Ornithological Highlights: Greater than 1000 shorebirds, mostly small sandpipers, have been found here during spring and fall migrations. The estuary is also an important wintering area for Tundra Swans.

For more information on Siuslaw River Estuary, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

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43.9663 -124.1021
Red Marker Smith and Bybee Wetlands Natural Area
Adjacent to the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers in a relatively industrial area of north Portland, Multnomah County. The site features Smith and Bybee wetlands and the closed 250-acre St. Johns Landfill, which provides grassland habitat.

Location: Adjacent to the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers, in north Portland, Multnomah County. 

Description: At nearly 2,000 acres, Smith and Bybee Wetlands Natural Area is one of the nation’s largest protected urban wetlands. The perimeter of the wetlands is riparian forest, which includes approximately 15 acres of ash forest, including mature tree specimens. The IBA also includes the 240-acre St. Johns Landfill, which provides valuable grassland habitat adjacent to the wetlands.

Ornithological Highlights: Smith and Bybee Wetlands are known to host over 100 bird species. Great Blue Heron nest on site, as well as Bald Eagle, Osprey, Pileated Woodpecker, Willow Flycatcher, Marsh Wren, and Savannah Sparrow. Peregrine Falcon and Northern Harrier hunt the marshes and meadows.

Tens of thousands of waterfowl winter in the wildlife area including: Canada Goose, Green-winged Teal, Pintail,  Northern Shoveler, Mallard, Common Merganser, Bufflehead, Lesser Scaup, Ringneck Duck, American Widgeon, Gadwall, Ruddy Duck, Wood Duck, Pied-billed Grebe, Double-crested Cormorant, and Great Egret. There are also occasional sightings of Canvasback, Redheads, Blue-winged Teal, and Tundra Swan.

The only documented breeding population of Streaked Horned Larks in Multnomah County exists on the nearby Port-owned Rivergate site, and they have been observed within the wildlife area of the landfill in winter months. Metro has seeded native grasses and forbes on five acres, and has been attempting to attract breeding Streaked Horned Larks to the site.

For more information about Smith and Bybee Wetlands Natural Area, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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Contacts: Contact the Metro Natural Areas Program at naturalareas@oregonmetro.gov for more information or call 503-797-1545.

45.614567 -122.748374
Red Marker Steens Mountain
This is a large mountain in southeast Oregon, running over 40 miles roughly north-northeast to south-southwest, the long slope to the west and the steep slopes and cliffs to the east.

Location: About 60 miles southeast of Burns, in southeast Harney County, southeast Oregon.

Description: This is a large fault-block mountain in southeast Oregon, running over 40 miles roughly north-northeast to south-southwest, the long slope to the west and the steep slopes and cliffs to the east. The sloping area to the west is incised by several large U-shaped valleys, the headwater basins for several rivers. Steens Mountain is draped with grass/forb/shrub meadows, aspen woodlands, rock outcrops, sage steppe, and snow much of the year.

Ornithological Highlights: This is the only known breeding site for Black Rosy-Finch in Oregon. Steens Mountain area is one of the most extensive areas of good habitat for Greater Sage-Grouse in Oregon.

For more information on Steens Mountain, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

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42.683221 -118.551021
Red Marker Summer Lake
Summer Lake is a large closed-basin playa in south-central Oregon.

Location: In south-central Oregon along Highway 31, west-central Lake County.

Description: Summer Lake is a classic closed-basin playa; however, it is unusually supplied by the spring-fed Ana River. The north end of the lake includes extensive impounded wetlands, while the southern playa offers extensive mudflats in late summer when water is present.

Ornithological Highlights: Summer Lake WMA, managed by ODFW, hosts thousands of wintering and migrating waterfowl. Summer Lake is an important area for Snowy Plover, hosting a significant percentage of Oregon's inland population. During fall migration, in years when water is present on the playa, incredible numbers of American Avocet, ranging from 30,000-50,000, gather on Summer Lake's mudflats. This is one of the few regional locations where Black-Crowned Night-Herons breed and roost.

For more information on Summer Lake, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.7994313199 -120.769958496
Red Marker Sutton Beach
This IBA consists of a 2-mile area of beach and open low dune where Sutton Creek enters the Pacific Ocean, on the central Oregon coast.

Location: Where Sutton Creek enters the Pacific Ocean about 5 miles north of Florence, Lane County, on the central Oregon coast.

Description:  A two mile area of beach and open low dunes from north of Berry Creek south to the mouth of Sutton Creek.

Ornithological Highlights: Wintering location for Snowy Plover.

For more information on Sutton Beach, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.0601 -124.1282
Red Marker Sycan Marsh and Forest
An area of wetlands and forest at the headwaters of the Klamath River basin in south central Oregon.

Location: In south-central Oregon south of Silver Lake (town) and Thompson Reservoir and west of Summer Lake, primarily in Lake County, but also partly in Klamath County.

Description: This area is comprised of over 30,000 acres of wetlands and forest owned by The Nature Conservancy. Sycan Marsh is in the Modoc Plateau and East Cascades ecoregions in the headwaters of the Klamath River Basin. The Upper Sycan River is a major tributary to Sycan Marsh, which provides about 50% of the inflow to the Marsh.

Ornithological Highlights: Tens of thousands of waterfowl, waterbirds, and shorebirds of dozens of species utilize the marsh, particularly in spring and summer. Up to 10,000 Tundra Swans can be found at the marsh during their northward spring migration. More than 100 Greater Sandhill Cranes nest on the marsh, as do Black terns and Yellow Rails. Ducks breeding at Sycan Marsh include Cinnamon Teal, Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shoveler, Redhead, Canvasback, Ring-necked Duck, Common Merganser, and Wood Duck. The sedge-dominated marsh is also home to many raptors including Bald Eagle and Goshawk.

For more information on Sycan Marsh, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.7999 -121.1011
Red Marker Table Rocks
An oak-woodland chaparral habitat in southwest Oregon, home to a unique bird community.

Location: In southwest Oregon, Upper and Lower Table Rocks are located about 10 miles west-northwest of Medford, west-central Jackson County.

Description: Includes Upper and Lower Table Rocks as well as Kelly Slough below Lower Table Rock. The flat-topped rock formations are flanked by oak-woodland chaparral, a threatened habitat in Oregon. The Table Rocks are managed cooperatively by the Nature Conservancy, the Bureau of Land Management, and Rogue River Ranch.

Ornithological Highlights: The oak-woodland chaparral habitat surrounding the rocks are home to a unique bird community that includes Oak Titmouse, Blue-gray Gnatchatcher, and California Towhee, as well as more widespread species such as Acorn Woodpecker, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Oregon Vesper Sparrow, Peregrine Falcon, Western Bluebird, Willow Flycatcher, and White-breasted Nuthatch.

Lower Table RockFor more information on Table Rocks, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.4766 -122.9119
Red Marker Tahkenitch Creek Estuary
On the south-central Oregon coast where Tahkenitch Creek enters the Pacific Ocean; a small beach area and small estuary at the mouth of Tahkenitch Creek.

Location: On the south-central Oregon coast where Tahkenitch Creek enters the Pacific Ocean, about 8 miles NNW of Reedsport, Douglas County.

Description: This is a small beach area and small estuary at the mouth of Tahkenitch Creek. At 25 acres, Tahkenitch Creek Estuary is one of the 17 minor estuaries in Oregon and is classified by the Oregon Estuary Plan Book as “Natural”.

Ornithological Highlights: Snowy Plovers nest at the mouth of Tahkenitch Creek; this site is one of 8 seasonal Western Snowy Plover closure areas along the Oregon coast. Large concentrations of Sanderlings and other shorebirds can be found from Tahkenitch south to Threemile Creek. Other notable species present include Caspian Tern, Common Loon, Western Grebe, Red Crossbill, Olive-sided Flycatcher, Western Tanager, and Wrentit.

For more information on Tahkenitch Creek Estuary, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.8073 -124.1658
Red Marker Three Arch Rocks
Large rocks off the northern Oregon coast which serve as important seabird breeding colonies, Three Arch Rocks was the first designated National Wildlife Refuge west of the Mississippi River.

Location: On the northern Oregon coast about 2 miles south of Cape Meares and 1 mile west of Oceanside, Tillamook County.

Description: This site includes three large rocks and six small rocks totalling 15 acres. The four largest rocks serve as seabird breeding colonies, including Finley Rock, Middle Rock, Shag Rock, and Seal Rock. Shag Rock contains low vegetation on the north slope and Finley Rock contains vegetation on the north and east slopes and is the tallest rock at over 300 feet above sea level.

Ornithological Highlights: Twelve species of seabirds breed here totaling approximately 200,000 birds. This includes the largest breeding colony of Common Murre south of Alaska and Oregon's largest breeding colony of Tufted Puffin. Other seabird species breeding on this refuge include Leach's Storm-petrel, Brandt's Cormorant and Pigeon Guillemot. Over 800 Brown Pelicans have been seen here roosting and up to 13 Bald Eagles have been observed preying on seabirds.

For more information on Three Arch Rocks, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.464 -123.9879
Red Marker Tillamook Bay
Tillamook Bay is a small, shallow estuary about 60 miles west of Portland on the Oregon Coast.

Location: On the northern Oregon coast 60 miles west of Portland, adjacent to the town of Tillamook, Tillamook County.

Description: Tillamook Bay is a small, shallow estuary approximately 6.2 miles long and 2.1 miles wide. The bay averages only 6.6 feet in depth over a total area of 13 square miles, or 8,400 acres. At low tide, about 50% of the estuary bottom is exposed as intertidal mud flats. The Bay receives fresh water input from five rivers and exchanges ocean water through a single channel in the northwest corner. The estuary provides habitat for numerous fish, shellfish, crabs, birds, seals, and sea grasses.

Ornithological Highlights: Tillamook Bay supports almost 25% of the northern- and central-coast wintering waterfowl population in Oregon, with winter counts of approximately 7,500 waterfowl of 34 species. These include large numbers of Northern Pintail, Surf Scoter, and Bufflehead. Brown Pelicans utilize the Bay from May-December and peak in September with numbers in the low 100s. Western Sandpiper numbers range 1,000-3,000 in September, with Least Sandpiper numbers in the low 100s. Black-bellied Plover, Semipalmated Plover, Whimbrel, Sanderling, Dunlin, and Short-billed Dowitcher are also seen. Great Blue Herons are year-round residents, and there are two heron rookeries in the vicinity. The north end of Bayocean Spit hosts a population of State and Federally-listed (as threatened) Western Snowy Plover.

For more information on Tillamook Bay, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

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45.5129 -123.9165
Red Marker Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge
One of the few refuges in the U.S. near a large urban area, this site is currently several thousand acres and may increase to 6,000 acres in the near future.

Location: Established in 1992, the refuge is located within the floodplain of the Tualatin River basin near Sherwood, Oregon, on the outskirts of southwest Portland in Washington County.

Description: One of the few refuges in the U.S. near a large urban area, this site is currently several thousand acres and may increase to 6,000 acres in the near future. Refuge habitats are varied and include rivers and streams, seasonal and forested wetlands, riparian areas, grasslands, and forested uplands.

Ornithological Highlights: In winter there are typically 15,000 to 30,000 waterfowl present on the refuge, with Northern Pintail exceeding 18,000 and Cackling Canada Goose exceeding 8,000 birds. In addition, shorebirds of many species are found on the refuge during spring and fall migration periods in numbers exceeding 100 birds. An important breeding area for neotropical migratory songbirds, the refuge also supports a significant breeding population of Wood Duck and Hooded Merganser.

For more information on Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database. 

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45.4005 -122.8933
Red Marker Two Arches Rock NWR
Rocks off the north-central Oregon coast which serve as important seabird habitat.

Location: On the north-central Oregon coast, just off Cape Kiwanda, southern Tillamook County.

Description: This IBA includes the namesake rock as well as adjacent rocks and a small area of headland.

Ornithological Highlights: This site supports more than 42,000 nesting seabirds including 6% of the Oregon Common Murre breeding population. In addition, two Bald Eagle nests occur in close proximity to this site and eagles commonly prey on nesting seabirds here.

For more information on Two Arches Rock, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.06072 -124.01736
Red Marker Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge
An area of wetlands, sloughs, and grasslands along the Columbia River in north-central Oregon.

Location: In north-central Oregon along the Columbia River, north and northeast of Boardman, northern Morrow County.

Description: Habitats consist of wetlands and sloughs influenced by John Day pool, riparian areas consisting of cottonwood, willow and non-native woody species, and shrub-steppe uplands containing some sagebrush, bitterbrush, rabbitbrush, and native bunchgrasses, but now largely dominated by annual grasses due to recent fire history.

Ornithological Highlights: The locally rare wetland and riparian habitats of the Umatilla NWR host many thousands of migrating and resident waterfowl and passerines. A significant number of Bald Eagles (30) spend the winter at the refuge. A large Great Blue Heron nesting colony as well as a smaller Black-crowned Night-Heron colony exist on refuge islands.

For more information on Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.9044 -119.6035
Red Marker Umpqua River Estuary
An estuary on the central Oregon coast where the Umpqua River meets the Pacific Ocean.

Location: On the central Oregon coast where the Umpqua River meets the Pacific Ocean, near Reedsport and Winchester Bay, western Douglas County.

Description: Includes submerged lands, mudflats, sandflats, and lower salt marshes up to mean high tide. The estuary opens to the ocean at the southern tip of the Oregon Dunes National Recreational Area and to the north of the Umpqua River Lighthouse State Park. The estuary is approximately 6,544 acres in area and has a watershed of approximately 605 square miles.

Ornithological Highlights: Upwards of 5,000 waterfowl have been regularly counted here, as well as  greater than 1,000 shorebirds. The North Spit of the Umpqua River is a designated USFWS Western Snowy Plover Critical Habitat area.

For more information on Umpqua River Estuary, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.7284 -124.1543
Red Marker Upper Klamath Lake
Oregon's largest lake. The lake includes tens of thousands of acres of open water and a variety of marsh habitats.

Location: In south-central Oregon near Klamath Falls, Klamath County.

Description: Oregon's largest lake. The lake includes tens of thousands of acres of open water and a variety of marsh habitats.

Ornithological Highlights: This area annually hosts American White Pelican, nesting Great Egret and Black-crowned Night-Heron. During migration and winter, thousands of Tundra Swans, tens of thousands of geese, and hundreds of thousands of ducks are present. Other species of significance include Western and Clark's Grebe, Yellow Rail, Sora, Virginia Rail, Least Bittern, Snowy Egret, Green Heron, Tricolored Blackbird (Williamson River Delta), Wilson's Phalarope, Sandhill Crane, Caspian Tern, and Bald Eagle.

For more information on Upper Klamath Lake, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA databas.

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42.3982 -121.8825
Red Marker Upper 12 Mile Creek
Upper 12 Mile Creek headwaters (at 7,000 feet) and riparian buffer along the creek in Oregon Canyon Mountains, SE Oregon, Malheur County.

Location: This IBA falls within the Oregon Canyon/Trout Creek Mountains IBA boundary and within the BLM Twelvemile Creek Wilderness Study Area in SE Oregon, Malheur County. The IBA starts at the Upper 12 Mile Creek headwaters (at 7,000 feet) and includes riparian areas along the creek.

Description: Mixed aspen, willow, sage, river birch, serviceberry, snowberry, large patches of mountain mohagany as well as native wildflowers and grasses are common here.

Ornithological Highlights: This IBA hosts Broad-tailed Hummingbird, White-crowned Sparrow, Fox Sparrow, and Virginia Warbler.

For more information on the Upper 12-Mile Creek IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA Database.

42.2657461 -118.0199479
Red Marker Upper Twomile Creek on Battle Mountain
North of McDermitt, Nevada, on the west slope of Battle Mountain in southern Malheur County.

Location: North of McDermitt, Nevada, on the west slope of Battle Mountain in southern Malheur County, southeastern Oregon.

Description: This area is a large cirque (a landform found among mountains as a result of alpine glaciers, the floor of which is often scooped out) with overhead canopy of Mountain Mahogany, and understory of chokecherry and snowberry on steep slopes of greater than 60 degrees. Headwaters of Twomile Creek and downstream represent a narrow riparian valley (8-10 acres across).

Ornithological Highlights: Probable or confirmed breeding populations of Black-throated Gray Warbler, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Nashville Warbler, and Virginia's Warbler. Prairie Falcon also present.

For more information on Upper Twomile Creek IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

42.069497 -117.6398927
Red Marker Wallowa Mountains
This mountain range in northeastern Oregon has many characteristics similar to the Rocky Mountains.

Location: In far northeast Oregon, ESE of LaGrande and NE of Baker, and entering Union, Wallowa, and Baker counties.

Description: This mountain range has many characteristics similar to the Rocky Mountains. Higher elevations are within the Eagle Cap Wilderness Area and much of the range is administered by the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest. Lower elevations are a mix of ownerships.

Ornithological Highlights: The Wallowa Mountains comprise the entire range of Spruce Grouse in Oregon, are the only area with regular confirmed breeding of Pine Grosbeak in Oregon, and comprise the entire breeding range of an Oregon endemic taxon, the Wallowa Rosy Finch (subspecies of Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch). Black Swifts have also been seen here.

For more information on the Wallowa mountains, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.1999 -117.3177
Red Marker Whalehead Island
A group of rocks on the southern Oregon coast off the mouth of Whalehead Creek, less than a mile south of Samuel H. Boardman State Park.

Location: On the southern Oregon coast off the mouth of Whalehead Creek, less than a mile south of Samuel H. Boardman State Park, southern Curry County.

Description: This site includes four rocks that serve as major seabird breeding colonies. Three of these rocks are heavily vegetated and provide habitat for burrow-nesting seabirds while the fourth contains significant rocky exposed areas where Common Murre nests.

Ornithological Highlights: This site hosts more than 167,000 breeding seabirds, including 29% of the Oregon Leach's Storm-Petrel nesting population and 5% of the Common Murre population.

For more information on Whalehead Island, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.14 -124.3614
Red Marker Warner Basin
Abutting the western border of Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge, near Plush, Oregon in Lake County, Southeastern Oregon.

Location: Abutting the western border of Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge near Plush, in Lake County, Southeastern Oregon.

Description: A series of large inland lakes, wetlands, and flood-irrigated meadows. Warner Basin is largely owned and managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and 52,033 acres are designated an Area of Critical Environmental Concern.  The area encompasses 900 acres of associated private inholdings.

Ornithological Highlights: This IBA is an important site for Sandhill Crane, up to 10,000 nesting waterfowl, and thousands of migrating ducks and geese. Moderate shorebird use includes White-faced Ibis, Snowy Egret, Black-necked Stilt, and Long-billed Curlew. Other notable birds here include American White Pelican, Pied-billed Grebe, Sora, Viriginia Rail, Yellow Rail, and American Bittern.

For more information on Warner Basin IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.5560049 -119.7533296
Red Marker Whetstone Savanna
This 150-acre preserve owned by The Nature Conservancy consists of native dry and wet prairie habitats as well as shrubs and oak savanna.

Location: North of Medford, central Jackson County.

Description: This 150-acre preserve owned by The Nature Conservancy consists of native dry and wet prairie habitats as well as shrubs and oak savanna.

Ornithological Highlights: This site typically winters 4-15 Lewis's Woodpeckers.

For more information on Whetstone Savanna, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.44149 -122.91367
Red Marker Whitehorse County Park
Roughly 150 acres along the Rogue River in southwest Oregon, from the confluence with the Applegate River to the lower end of the county park.

Location: Southwest Oregon along the Rogue River about 5 miles west of Grants Pass.

Description: Roughly 150 acres along the Rogue River, from the confluence with the Applegate River to the lower end of the county park. Includes multiple ownerships, but mostly county. Includes the river itself, with gravel bars, large-size cottonwood gallery forest, willow and blackberry thickets, some small grassland areas, and backwater locations, sloughs and ponds.

Ornithological Highlights: The strength of this site is the high species richness due to the diversity of habitats in this small area. Of 20 sites surveyed monthly (April 1999 to February 2002) in the Rogue Valley -- and chosen in part for their diversity -- the greatest number of species (144) were recorded at Whitehorse County Park. Over 170 species have been recorded here in the past 30 years.

For more information on Whitehorse, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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42.4341 -123.4601
Red Marker Wickiup Reservoir
A large reservoir in the central/eastern Cascades.

Location: In the central Cascades, southwest Deschutes County, about 10 miles west of LaPine.

Description: Wickiup Reservoir is a wide shallow basin perched high in the foothills of the eastern  Cascades.

Ornithological Highlights: Hosts the largest inland concentrations of migrant Common Loon in the state. Reports in some years have exceeded 400 birds. Other recorded species include a variety of ducks, Great Egret, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, Red-necked Phalarope, Western, Least and Baird's Sandpiper, Long-billed Dowitcher, Brown Pelican, Black-crowned Night Heron, and White-faced Ibis.

For more information on Wickiup Reservoir, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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43.69043 -121.69834
Red Marker William Finley National Wildlife Refuge
This national wildlife refuge was established in 1964 to provide winter habitat for Dusky Canada Geese, a subspecies that winters primarily in the Willamette Valley.

William Finley NWRLocation: In the west-central Willamette Valley, about 12 miles south of Corvallis, Benton County.

Description: This national wildlife refuge was established in 1964 to provide winter habitat for Dusky Canada Geese, a subspecies that winters primarily in the Willamette Valley. Grass fields provide forage for wintering goose flocks and restored wetlands provide roosting habitat for geese, as well as habitat for other waterfowl. A riparian ash forest, oak-conifer woodland, oak savanna, wet prairie, and upland prairie provide habitat for other wildlife and rare native plants.

Ornithological Highlights: Riparian habitat on the refuge supports Yellow Warbler and Swainson's Thrush that are believed to exceed 25 pairs. Oak woodlands support Bushtit, Bewick's Wren, and Western Wood-Pewee populations that probably exceed 25 pairs. The refuge supports large concentrations of wintering waterfowl; there are regularly well over 2,000 waterfowl present on the refuge during the winter.

For more information on William Finley National Wildlife Refuge, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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Bird List

44.4096 -123.3248
Red Marker Yaquina Bay
Yaquina Estuary is a drowned river valley on the central Oregon coast just south of Newport.

Location: On the central Oregon Coast at Newport, Lincoln County. The estuary is approximately 4329 acres in area and has a watershed of approximately 253 square miles.

Description: Yaquina Estuary is a drowned river valley consisting of three general areas: a narrow mouth, embayments, and a narrow upstream channel. It is one of the three Oregon estuaries classed for deep water development because of maintained jetties and a main channel dredged to deeper than 22 feet; nevertheless, the Yaquina and the other two deep water estuaries (Columbia River and Coos Bay) are still important for birds. The town of Newport  is near the estuary mouth, and Toledo is at river mile 13. The Oregon State University (OSU) Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) is a research and educational institution near the IBA.

Ornithological Highlights: Yaquina Bay regularly hosts thousands of waterfowl and shorebirds.

For more information on Yaquina Bay, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.612638 -124.044199
Red Marker Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area
Rocks, islands and cliffs on the central Oregon coast north of Newport.

Location: On the central Oregon coast about 3 miles north of Newport, Lincoln County.

Description: The rocks and islands of this site are generally small and lack soil and vegetation. The headland includes steep sea cliffs and heavily vegetated upland terraces and hills.

Ornithological Highlights: This site supports more than 52,000 nesting seabirds comprised of eight species. The number of Brandt's Cormorants breeding here averages more than 800 nests/year with a peak of more the 1,500 nests. The Common Murre breeding population has soared and now averages about 80,000 birds, making this one of the largest breeding locations in Oregon. The Pelagic Cormorant population breeding at Yaquina Head averages ~610 nests/year, and there are 6-7 pairs of Black Oystercatchers here. Bald Eagles use this site for preying on Common Murre.

For more information on Yaquina Head, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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44.677 -124.0796
Red Marker Zumwalt Prairie
Zumwalt is a bunchgrass prairie preserve in northeastern Oregon.

Location: A grassland preserve northeast of Enterprise, Wallowa county, in northeastern Oregon.

Description: Zumwalt Prairie is one of the largest areas of Pacific Northwest Bunchgrass remaining in the United States. The Preserve, owned and managed by The Nature Conservancy, is a 33,000 acre parcel of the greater prairie covering approximately 160,000 acres or over 200 square miles of land. This area consists of expanses of shallow and deep-soiled bunchgrass prairie dissected by steep canyon grasslands as well as pine woodlands, quaking aspen groves, and spring-fed riparian ecosystems.

Ornithological Highlights: This area is home to a diverse array of breeding raptor species including the grassland-dependent Ferruginous Hawk as well as Swainson's hawk and Prairie Falcon. The Zumwalt area supports important breeding populations of grassland songbirds such as Savannah Sparrow, Western Meadowlark, Vesper Sparrow, Horned Lark, and Grasshopper Sparrow. Wintering species include Gray-crowned Rosy-finch, Snow Bunting, Northern Shrike, and Rough-legged Hawk. The Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse, extirpated from the prairie by the 1940s, was reintroduced by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife in 1991. A small population occurs just northeast of the city of Enterprise.

For more information on Zumwalt Prairie, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

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45.5029443 -116.9721522
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