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China Gulch

This valley in west-central Jackson County, Oregon is roughly 6,600 acres of chaparral with scattered small forest patches in generally south-facing drainages.

Red Marker China Gulch
This valley in west-central Jackson County, Oregon is roughly 6,600 acres of chaparral with scattered small forest patches in generally south-facing drainages.

Location: Southwest Oregon, west-central Jackson County, just east of the town of Applegate and north of the Applegate River.

Description: Roughly 6,600 acres of chaparral, a high priority habitat in western Oregon lowlands and valleys where chaparral has been reduced for farming and grazing.

Ornithological Highlights: This IBA contains one of the largest remaining patches of chaparral in southwest Oregon, and hosts three bird species unique to this habitat: Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Oak Titmouse, and California Towhee. Titmouse and Towhee are year-round residents here and the Gnatcatcher migrates from points south to breed here in the summer. The area also provides excellent winter cover and food resources for a diversity of birds year-round. During winter, manzanita provides a berry food source for several species, particularly Hermit Thrush. In early spring, manzanita flowers provide a nectar heavily used by arriving Rufous Hummingbird. The flowers are also eaten by Purple Finch and Golden-crowned Sparrow before and during spring migration.
Chaparral is a priority habitat in western Oregon lowlands & valleys, and has been reduced in extent in southwest Oregon through clearing for farming or grazing, overgrowth by trees due to fire suppression, clearing for development, and clearing to reduce fire hazard near developed areas.

For more information, please see the Technical Report in the National IBA database.

42.25777 -123.06788

Location: Southwest Oregon, west-central Jackson County, just east of the town of Applegate and north of the Applegate River.

Description: Roughly 6,600 acres of chaparral, a high priority habitat in western Oregon lowlands and valleys where chaparral has been reduced for farming and grazing.

Ornithological Highlights: This IBA contains one of the largest remaining patches of chaparral in southwest Oregon, and hosts three bird species unique to this habitat: Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Oak Titmouse, and California Towhee. Titmouse and Towhee are year-round residents here and the Gnatcatcher migrates from points south to breed here in the summer. The area also provides excellent winter cover and food resources for a diversity of birds year-round. During winter, manzanita provides a berry food source for several species, particularly Hermit Thrush. In early spring, manzanita flowers provide a nectar heavily used by arriving Rufous Hummingbird. The flowers are also eaten by Purple Finch and Golden-crowned Sparrow before and during spring migration.
Chaparral is a priority habitat in western Oregon lowlands & valleys, and has been reduced in extent in southwest Oregon through clearing for farming or grazing, overgrowth by trees due to fire suppression, clearing for development, and clearing to reduce fire hazard near developed areas.

For more information, please see the Technical Report in the National IBA database.

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