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Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuge

Cold Springs NWR IBA is a 3,117-acre refuge east of Hermiston, Oregon, approximately 5 miles south of the Columbia River. The refuge includes a 1500-acre reservoir and surrounding marsh, diverse wetland habitats, cottonwood/willow riparian area, upland big sagebrush and native steppe grasses.

Red Marker Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuge
Cold Springs NWR IBA is a 3,117-acre refuge east of Hermiston, Oregon, approximately 5 miles south of the Columbia River. The refuge includes a 1500-acre reservoir and surrounding marsh, diverse wetland habitats, cottonwood/willow riparian area, upland big sagebrush and native steppe grasses.

Location: Five miles south of the Columbia River and east of Hermiston, Umatilla County, Oregon.

Description: Cold springs NWR was established in 1909 as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds. The 3,117 acres of this refuge include and surround the 1,517-acre Cold Springs Reservoir. The remainder of the refuge consists of marsh, riparian, grassland, and sagebrush ecosystems.This is an overlay refuge: the Bureau of Reclamation manages the water in Cold Springs Reservoir for irrigation purposes and USFWS manages the surrounding habitat for migratory birds.

Ornithological Highlights: The refuge hosts thousands of wintering waterfowl: Mallard and Canada Geese are the dominant species, but good numbers of American Wigeon and Northern Pintail can often be found. A USFWS aerial survey in December 2002 yielded 10,740 Mallards, 3,010 Canada Geese, and 2,000 Northern Pintails. Green-winged Teal, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler, Redhead, Canvasback, Lesser Scaup, Common Merganser, Common Goldeneye, and Ring-necked Ducks are also common, though in smaller numbers. Small flocks of White-fronted Geese stop at Cold Springs during fall and spring migration. Tundra Swans can also been seen at Cold Springs. Hundreds of shorebirds can be seen during the fall migration when the upper reservoir is exposed. Counts have recorded up to 500 Western Sandpiper in August 2003 and 900 Killdeer in September 2003. Smaller numbers of shorebirds frequent Memorial Marsh during the spring migration.

Abundant wintering or migrant species include Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hermit Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Oregon Junco, and White-crowned Sparrow.

For more information on Cold Springs NWR IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

The Cold Springs NWR is a preserve for native and migratory birds. Credit: USFWS
45.8563037762 -119.158401489

Location: Five miles south of the Columbia River and east of Hermiston, Umatilla County, Oregon.

Description: Cold springs NWR was established in 1909 as a preserve and breeding ground for native birds. The 3,117 acres of this refuge include and surround the 1,517-acre Cold Springs Reservoir. The remainder of the refuge consists of marsh, riparian, grassland, and sagebrush ecosystems.This is an overlay refuge: the Bureau of Reclamation manages the water in Cold Springs Reservoir for irrigation purposes and USFWS manages the surrounding habitat for migratory birds.

Ornithological Highlights: The refuge hosts thousands of wintering waterfowl: Mallard and Canada Geese are the dominant species, but good numbers of American Wigeon and Northern Pintail can often be found. A USFWS aerial survey in December 2002 yielded 10,740 Mallards, 3,010 Canada Geese, and 2,000 Northern Pintails. Green-winged Teal, Gadwall, Northern Shoveler, Redhead, Canvasback, Lesser Scaup, Common Merganser, Common Goldeneye, and Ring-necked Ducks are also common, though in smaller numbers. Small flocks of White-fronted Geese stop at Cold Springs during fall and spring migration. Tundra Swans can also been seen at Cold Springs. Hundreds of shorebirds can be seen during the fall migration when the upper reservoir is exposed. Counts have recorded up to 500 Western Sandpiper in August 2003 and 900 Killdeer in September 2003. Smaller numbers of shorebirds frequent Memorial Marsh during the spring migration.

Abundant wintering or migrant species include Orange-crowned Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Wilson's Warbler, Warbling Vireo, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Hermit Thrush, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Oregon Junco, and White-crowned Sparrow.

For more information on Cold Springs NWR IBA, please see the Technical Site Report in the National IBA database.

Links:

The Cold Springs NWR is a preserve for native and migratory birds. Credit: USFWS
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