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Care Center Blog

Read about the day-to-day work of the Audubon Society of Portland's Wildlife Care Center, the oldest and busiest wildlife rehabilitation facility in Oregon.

Millions of birds manage the impressive feat of round-trip migration, sometimes thousands of miles, returning to nesting and wintering locations year after year. ​Long-distance, nocturnal migrants, like the Western Tanager, travel from Mexico and Central America,​ to western North America as far north as Alaska. They migrate at night to avoid predation and maximize daytime foraging hours, using celestial cues from the stars for navigation. By the time they reach Oregon, they may have already traveled ​over ​3,000​ miles, making it past predators, storms, and other obstacles. More...

Western Tanager receiving an exam at the Wildlife Care Center.

When Daria, a 17-year-old high school student in West Linn, went to the park with her environmental science class to plant native trees and remove invasive plants like ivy and blackberry, she knew she’d be spending the day restoring habitat and helping wildlife. She didn’t imagine that she’d end up personally rescuing a bird who, without intervention, would not have survived. More...

Wildlife Care Center Staff treat Canada Goose found with fishing line around its neck

In 2016 seven baby American Kestrels, North America’s smallest falcons, were brought into our Wildlife Care Center. Each has its own unique story, but almost all share a common and easily avoidable theme: human interference. More...

Photo by Tom Schmid

Filed under: Release, Bald Eagles

Have you ever heard of an avian rehabilitation technique called imping? Most people, unless they’ve cared for injured birds, have never heard of this falconry practice dating back several thousand years. More...

Photo by Tom Schmid

Despite being a quiet, relatively small, and nocturnal mammal, skunks aren’t widely embraced as a favorite urban species. In addition to building dens in remote and varied habitats, skunks have been known to den beneath people’s porches and in their sheds, leading residents to worry that their dogs or cats could get sprayed. If people knew just how easy it is to safely and humanely prompt skunks to vacate and relocate themselves, so many lives would be saved. More...

This young skunk explores its surroundings in its brand new forest habitat.

Wildlife face many human-caused threats such as habitat loss, window strikes, car collisions, poaching and lead poisoning. Audubon works to address all the major cause of bird declines with the majority of our focus going to protecting and restoring habitat. More...

House Finches receiving one of their many feedings. Photo by Lauren Lark

A Northern Saw-whet Owl hit a window at Corbett Elementary school causing its legs to be temporarily paralyzed. With a lot of time and care, this owl recovered and was released back into the wild. More...

Northern Saw-whet Owl Receives Exam by Lacy Campbell

Back in early March we received a baby Great Horned Owl that had been found with its dead sibling and destroyed nest in Vancouver, Washington. A storm blew the nest out of the tree leaving the bird was soaked, cold, and in need of our help. More...

Great Horned Owl a week after it was returned to its parents - Photo by by Scott Carpenter

Filed under: Release, Raptors, Lead poisoning

On December 31, 2015 Chris Kaleta turned into her driveway and spotted something brown in the grass. She got out of her car to get a closer look and found an immobile and sick looking Red-tailed Hawk on the ground. Chris ran inside to get her husband, Gary, and both approached the bird, even reaching down to find that, despite the cold temperatures outside, he was still warm. More...

Red-tailed Hawk recovers in flight cage before release

On Sunday afternoon the clouds cleared and the sun came out just as Deb Sheaffer, the Wildlife Care Center Veterinarian, and Lacy Campbell, the Care Center Operations Manager, arrived at Waterfront Park in downtown Portland with the Willamette Bald Eagle. More...

Photo of release by Tom Schmid

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