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A stuck Red-tailed Hawk

Posted by tinsley hunsdorfer at Feb 20, 2013 04:00 PM |
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Feb. 20, 2013: A few weeks ago, this Red-tailed Hawk managed to wedge itself between two shipping containers in northeast Portland, and according to the people who found the hawk, rodents are sometimes seen scuttling through the area. The bird probably got stuck while chasing a rat or mouse.

A stuck Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk - Tinsley Hunsdorfer

A few weeks ago, this Red-tailed Hawk managed to wedge itself between two shipping containers in northeast Portland. According to the people who found the bird, rodents are sometimes seen scuttling through the area, which makes it likely that the hawk got stuck while chasing a rat or mouse.

Since its arrival at the care center, staff and volunteers have been treating the bird for intestinal parasites and a leg wound it sustained while stuck between the containers. Its prognosis is still guarded, but the hawk’s most recent fecal test came back negative – no more parasites – and its leg is in good enough shape for the bird to move to a small, outdoor flight cage. If all goes well, we will soon transfer the hawk to a larger flight cage, where it can build up its flight muscles and practice hunting.

The hawk was found near Portland International Airport land, so it was initially turned over to the airport’s wildlife staff, who banded the bird and then brought it to the care center. This corps of wildlife biologists places federal bands on all raptors found on or near Port of Portland land; the identification number on each band is then entered into a national database that allows scientists to track banded birds throughout their lives. Learn more about banded birds.

Red-tailed Hawk, February 2013 - Tinsley Hunsdorfer
A Red-tailed Hawk receives an exam in the care center - Tinsley Hunsdorfer
Red-tailed Hawk, February 2013 - Tinsley Hunsdorfer
Care center veterinarian Deb Sheaffer and volunteer Joe Chapman place a protective sheath on a Red-tailed Hawk's tail - Tinsley Hunsdorfer
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