A Bald Eagle flies out of a white enclosure in a field full of yellow flowers.

Wildlife Care Center: Past, Present, and Future

William Finley understood something when he founded Portland Audubon in 1902 that remains an essential part of how we approach conservation today: Having empathy and appreciation for the wild animals that surround us is often the first step toward developing a conservation ethic. The new building will allow us to do so much more for the animals, and engage so many more people in the life-changing experience of helping a wild animal.

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Black and white residents from the town of Maxville gathering for a group photo1924-33

Oregon Black Pioneers

Today it is hard to find evidence of those trailblazing Black settlers. Oregon Black Pioneers (OBP), Oregon’s only statewide African American historical society, is working to change that.

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A photo of Kahler Martinson standing in a wetlands.

Remembering Kahler Martinson

Kahler was one of the giants of Portland Audubon over the past three decades, serving on our board of directors, Conservation Committee, and two tours of duty donating his time as Interim Executive Director during periods of transition.

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A photo of Portland Audubon's logos throughout our history. There are six total.

A Century in the Life of a Logo

These archives show the evolution of our organization, including our logo. Hidden among wildlife photos by William Finley and Herman Bohlman, and paintings by R. Bruce Horsfall, one particular slide stands out: a painting of a Rufous Hummingbird encircled by the words “Oregon Audubon Society.” This early logo, hand-drawn by Horsfall, dates back to at least 1919.

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