Juvenile Cooper's Hawk perched on leafy branch looking off

A Deluge of Cooper’s Hawks

While many species were affected by the heat dome, Cooper’s Hawks seemed to be particularly hard-hit—a stunning 110 young Cooper’s Hawks passed through our door during that time period in a phenomenon that some began referring to as “hawkpocalypse” and that we are still trying to understand.

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No Water, No Wetlands, No Birds

Last summer, more than 40,000 birds died from botulism caused by low water levels on Tule Lake and Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge. This year looks like it could be worse. A water crisis that has been building for decades is reaching a crescendo.

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Portland Audubon monument sign

Reimagining Our Signage and Educational Displays

The current signage and displays at our sanctuary have served us well for years, but they are overdue for an upgrade. Many are faded, some are broken, and the messaging needs to be updated. A small team, made up of representatives from Education, Conservation, Sanctuaries, our Board Equity Committee, and Communications, have joined together to reimagine what new signage and interpretive displays could look and feel like, and we’re excited by the possibilities.

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A Bald Eagle flies out of a white enclosure in a field full of yellow flowers.

Wildlife Care Center: Past, Present, and Future

William Finley understood something when he founded Portland Audubon in 1902 that remains an essential part of how we approach conservation today: Having empathy and appreciation for the wild animals that surround us is often the first step toward developing a conservation ethic. The new building will allow us to do so much more for the animals, and engage so many more people in the life-changing experience of helping a wild animal.

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A view of Willamette Cove and the nearby bridge.

Willamette Cove Update

In a disappointing but not unsurprising decision released on the final day of March, Oregon’s Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) selected a cleanup plan for the 27-acre Willamette Cove site. The plan would allow up to 27,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated above human health risk thresholds to remain onsite in an underground confined disposal area covering the equivalent of more than two football fields.

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