Take Action to Advocate for California Condors

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service and Yurok Tribe have released a long-awaited Condor Environmental Assessment (EA) to reintroduce California Condors into Northern California. If adopted, California condors could be released in California’s Redwood National Park as early as 2020. Given the foraging range of this magnificent bird, the construction of this release site is expected to result in Condor movement into Oregon after an over 100 year absence from northern portions of their historical range.

California Condor, photo by Nathan Rupert

Ensure that release of California Condors into Northern California occurs and that it is done in a way that maximizes protection for these birds.

Please let the agencies know that you strongly support the release of Condors in Northern California, but that it should be done in a way that maximizes protection for these birds.

Take Action

Establishment of the northern California release site is an important step forward in the recovery of this critically endangered species. We need your voice to ensure that release of California Condors into Northern California occurs and that it is done in a way that maximizes protection for these birds.

We are thrilled about the imminent return of Condors to Oregon, and continue to be concerned about threats to this population of birds, including lead poisoning as well as exposure to other contaminants, power line electrocution and wind turbines. Lead poisoning, in particular, through exposure to lead ammunition in the carrion they consume, remains the primary threat to these birds—California’s ban on the use of lead ammunition for hunting will be in full effect by July of this year, while lead ammunition is still in widespread use in Oregon. Please let the agencies know that you strongly support the release of Condors in Northern California, but that it should be done in a way that maximizes protection for these birds:

 

Talking Points

  1. You support release of California Condors into Northern California at Redwoods National Park
  2. The plan should include a strong strategy for eliminating the use of lead ammunition for hunting in Oregon. Poisoning from lead ammunition in carrion remains a primary threat to California Condors and puts other species such as Bald and Golden Eagles, Hawks Vultures and Ravens at risk as well. There are many alternatives to lead ammunition on the market. California’s ban on the use of lead ammunition for hunting will be in full effect by July, but the risk of lead exposure for these birds remains high in Oregon.
  3. The agencies should eliminate proposed exemptions from liability under the Endangered Species Act for electric utilities and wind farms. The US Fish and Wildlife Service should retain the ability to hold these companies accountable when their activities result in the death of endangered species.

Attend a public meeting

The National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Yurok Tribe will host two public meetings in northern California and two in Oregon to provide more information and to receive input on the proposed rule and environmental assessment. 

  • Portland, OR May 7, Oregon Zoo 6 – 8 p.m.
  • Medford, OR May 8, Santo Community Center Rm. 18 5:30-7:30 p.m.
  • Klamath, CA May 9, Yurok Tribal Office, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
  • Arcata, CA May 9, Arcata Community Center, 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.