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Care Center Blog

Read about the day-to-day work of the Audubon Society of Portland's Wildlife Care Center, the oldest and busiest wildlife rehabilitation facility in Oregon.

During baby bird season, fledgling Crows can often be seen on the ground while learning to fly. Because these still-young birds look like adults, it’s quite understandable when we humans mistake a fledgling Crow for an injured adult. More...

American Crow fledgling treated in our Wildlife Care Center in 2012.

The arrival of Barn Swallows is an annual sign of spring in horse barns and stables, and many relish their seasonal arrival…but not all. When some Portland-area equestrians discovered Barn Swallow excrement in their horse’s water troughs, rather than rejoice in the presence of these jewel-hued Swallows, they evicted them. More...

When an injured Great Blue Heron made its way into the Care Center this April, our staff had a feeling that it too was suffering from human-caused injuries. What do we do when humans and animals collide? How do we responsibly resolve conflicts with wild animals who share our urban forest, backyards, parks, and city streets? More...

When an orphaned gosling and injured goose came to our Wildlife Care Center within days of each other, our staff knew that fostering would be the best case scenario for both animals. More...

When you cast your fishing line, the last thing you’d expect to hook is a bird. While that scenario may sound absurd, it’s actually quite common. A Glaucous-winged Gull makes a recovery after getting hooked by fishing debris. More...

On a chilly November night, a Barred Owl flew silently, navigating through the streets and around buildings, carrying a meal: a partially eaten rat. When the raptor approached the glassy facade of the Apple Store, it met the fate of so many other birds. The adult owl hit the window, and fell approximately 20 feet to the ground. More...

Barred Owl receives examination following a window collision

Millions of birds manage the impressive feat of round-trip migration, sometimes thousands of miles, returning to nesting and wintering locations year after year. ​Long-distance, nocturnal migrants, like the Western Tanager, travel from Mexico and Central America,​ to western North America as far north as Alaska. They migrate at night to avoid predation and maximize daytime foraging hours, using celestial cues from the stars for navigation. By the time they reach Oregon, they may have already traveled ​over ​3,000​ miles, making it past predators, storms, and other obstacles. More...

Western Tanager receiving an exam at the Wildlife Care Center.

When Daria, a 17-year-old high school student in West Linn, went to the park with her environmental science class to plant native trees and remove invasive plants like ivy and blackberry, she knew she’d be spending the day restoring habitat and helping wildlife. She didn’t imagine that she’d end up personally rescuing a bird who, without intervention, would not have survived. More...

Wildlife Care Center Staff treat Canada Goose found with fishing line around its neck

In 2016 seven baby American Kestrels, North America’s smallest falcons, were brought into our Wildlife Care Center. Each has its own unique story, but almost all share a common and easily avoidable theme: human interference. More...

Photo by Tom Schmid

Filed under: Release, Bald Eagles

Have you ever heard of an avian rehabilitation technique called imping? Most people, unless they’ve cared for injured birds, have never heard of this falconry practice dating back several thousand years. More...

Photo by Tom Schmid

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