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Care Center Blog

Read about the day-to-day work of the Audubon Society of Portland's Wildlife Care Center, the oldest and busiest wildlife rehabilitation facility in Oregon.

A young Barn Owl found its way up to an 18th floor condo terrace on on SW 10th avenue. Little did the raptor know it might not make it back to the wild for quite some time. It was a morning in October when Michael Anderson spotted something moving out on the terrace from the corner of his eye. More...

Over the past year, the Wildlife Care Center took in over 3,100 patients of 160 different species. These animals came to us for many different reasons, from a young barn owl who fell into motor oil to a little brown bat stuck in a glue trap. More...

When a Spotted Towhee was nearly caught by a feline attacker in Northwest Portland in October, the event served as a reminder of the delicate balance between wildlife and domesticated animals. More...

 

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Photo by Adam Stunkel. This image is a stock photo, and is not the bird treated in this story.

After landing in a sewage slurry at a local Wastewater Treatment lagoon, this Bald Eagle made a full recovery thanks to the help of a Waste Treatment Operator and the Wildlife Care Center. More...

During baby bird season, fledgling Crows can often be seen on the ground while learning to fly. Because these still-young birds look like adults, it’s quite understandable when we humans mistake a fledgling Crow for an injured adult. More...

American Crow fledgling treated in our Wildlife Care Center in 2012.

The arrival of Barn Swallows is an annual sign of spring in horse barns and stables, and many relish their seasonal arrival…but not all. When some Portland-area equestrians discovered Barn Swallow excrement in their horse’s water troughs, rather than rejoice in the presence of these jewel-hued Swallows, they evicted them. More...

When an injured Great Blue Heron made its way into the Care Center this April, our staff had a feeling that it too was suffering from human-caused injuries. What do we do when humans and animals collide? How do we responsibly resolve conflicts with wild animals who share our urban forest, backyards, parks, and city streets? More...

When an orphaned gosling and injured goose came to our Wildlife Care Center within days of each other, our staff knew that fostering would be the best case scenario for both animals. More...

When you cast your fishing line, the last thing you’d expect to hook is a bird. While that scenario may sound absurd, it’s actually quite common. A Glaucous-winged Gull makes a recovery after getting hooked by fishing debris. More...

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